[PDF] STUDENT HANDBOOK ACKNOWLEDGMENT FORM - Free Download PDF (2024)

1 STUDENT HANDBOOK ACKNOWLEDGMENT FORM I have received and read my copy of the Theodore Roosevelt High School Student Ha...

STUDENT HANDBOOK ACKNOWLEDGMENT FORM I have received and read my copy of the 2016-2017 Theodore Roosevelt High School Student Handbook. I know I am responsible for adhering to all of the policies and procedures contained in this student handbook. I agree to follow all of the policies and procedures contained in the student code of conduct. I also understand that if I violate the policies and procedures contained in the handbook that I will receive the appropriate consequences. ______________________________________________ Student Name (PRINT)

__________________ Grade

______________________________________________ Student Signature

__________________ Date

______________________________________________ Name of First Period Teacher

__________________ Classroom #

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Theodore Roosevelt High School 2016-2017

STUDENT HANDBOOK & PLANNER

1400 N. Mantua Street • Kent, Ohio 44240 • 330-676-8700 • www.kentschools.net/rhs

ALMA MATER

Our strong band can ne’er be broken, Form’d in Roosevelt High Far surpassing wealth unspoken, Seal’d by friendship’s tie.

Alma Mater, Alma Mater Deep graven on each heart, Shall be found unwav’ring, true, When we from life shall part.

Property of: ______________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________ Phone #: _____________________ Email:____________________ In case of emergency, please notify: Name:_______________________ Phone #: __________________

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Mission Statement .................................................. 8 Purpose of Handbook ............................................. 9 Academic Integrity Policy........................................ 9 After-School Procedures......................................... 9 Announcements...................................................... 9 Arrival/Pick-Up ........................................................ 9 Assemblies............................................................ 10 Attendance Policy ................................................. 10 Auditing Courses................................................... 11 Bus Transportation ............................................... 11 Cafeteria Procedures............................................ 11 Care of School Property ....................................... 11 Chemical Abuse.................................................... 11 Clinic ..................................................................... 11 College Credit Plus Program ................................ 11 College Information and Test Dates for 2016-2017 ................................ 12 Credit Flexibility Plan ............................................ 13 Detentions............................................................. 13 Distribution of Material .......................................... 13 Dress Guidelines................................................... 13 Driving & Parking Policy ....................................... 14 Early Graduation................................................... 14 Elections Policy..................................................... 15 Electronic Devices ................................................ 17 Emergency Medical Authorization Forms............. 17 Emergency School Closing................................... 17 Eighteen-Year-Old or Older Students................... 18 Exams ................................................................... 18 Fees ...................................................................... 18 FERPA and Directory Information ........................ 18 Fire Drills............................................................... 19 Flex Eligibility (Seniors Only) ................................ 19 Grade Classification.............................................. 19 Grading Criteria..................................................... 19 Grading System & Procedures ............................. 19 Graduation Requirements..................................... 20 Diploma with Honors............................................. 22 Hall Traffic............................................................. 23 Harassment........................................................... 23 Hazing................................................................... 23 Homework............................................................. 24 Honor and Merit Roll............................................. 24 Illness While in School.......................................... 24 Immunization......................................................... 24 Incomplete Grade(s) ............................................. 25 Initiating Change................................................... 25 Insurance for Students/Athletes ........................... 25 Interim Reports ..................................................... 25 Leaving Building/School Grounds ........................ 25

Lockers ..................................................................25 Loitering.................................................................25 Lost and Found......................................................25 Make-Up Work.......................................................26 Media Center Policies and Procedures.................26 Medications ...........................................................26 Missing or Absent Children ...................................26 Ohio Graduation Test ............................................27 Pepper Gas ...........................................................27 Police Involvement ................................................27 Principal’s Scholar Award......................................27 Psychological and Speech Therapist Aid..............27 Rank in Class ........................................................27 Retaking Courses..................................................28 Schedule Changes ................................................28 School Counseling Program for 2016-2017 ..........29 Smoking/Tobacco..................................................29 Activities Participation Consequences ..................29 Sportsmanship.......................................................30 Student Activities...................................................30 Student Athletics....................................................30 Student Behavior...................................................30 Student Center ......................................................30 Student Council .....................................................30 Students Entering Building ....................................30 Study Hall ..............................................................30 Substitute Teachers ..............................................30 Suspended/Expelled Students ..............................30 Suspension Appeal ...............................................31 Tardiness...............................................................31 Textbooks ..............................................................31 Theft of Property....................................................31 Tornado Drill ..........................................................31 Visitors...................................................................31 Withdraw Fail (WF)................................................31 Withdrawal From School .......................................31 Work Certificate .....................................................31 Student Conduct Code ..........................................32 Automatic Consequences .....................................36 Student Guide to Athletics 2016-2017 ..................41 2016-2017 OHSAA Student Athlete Eligibility Guide .................................................48 Student Guide to Activities 2016-2017..................52 Activity & Advisor List 2016-2017..........................53 Student Activity Descriptions.................................56 Theodore Roosevelt High School Co-Curricular Student Activity Conduct Code.........................63 Schedule of Events 2016-2017 .............................65 Important Telephone Numbers..............................73 People You Should Know For 2016-2017.............74

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MY 2016-17 CLASS SCHEDULE: FIRST SEMESTER: MY LUNCH PERIOD (EITHER 4TH, 6TH, OR 8TH): ___________________ 1ST PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 2ND PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 3RD PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 4TH/5TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 5TH/6TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 6TH/7TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 7TH/8TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 9TH PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 10TH PERIOD: __________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ SECOND SEMESTER: MY LUNCH PERIOD (EITHER 4TH, 6TH, OR 8TH): ___________________ 1ST PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 2ND PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 3RD PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 4TH/5TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 5TH/6TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 6TH/7TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 7TH/8TH PERIOD: ________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 9TH PERIOD: ___________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 10TH PERIOD: __________________________________________________ RM #: _____________ 6

2016 - 2017 SCHOOL YEAR BELL SCHEDULE DAILY SCHEDULE

4TH PERIOD LUNCH SCHEDULE

6TH PERIOD LUNCH SCHEDULE

8TH PERIOD LUNCH SCHEDULE

PERIOD 1

7:30 – 8:21 (51 minutes)

PERIOD 2

8:25 – 9:16 (51 minutes)

PERIOD 3

9:20 - 10:15 (51 minutes + 4 min. for announcements)

PERIOD 4

PERIOD 5 PERIOD 6

PERIOD 7 PERIOD 8

10:19 – 10:49 LUNCH

10:19 – 11:10 4/5 CLASS (51 minutes)

10:19 – 11:10 4/5 CLASS (51 minutes)

10:53 – 11:44 5/6 CLASS (51 minutes)

11:14 – 11:44 LUNCH

11:14 – 12:05 6/7 CLASS (51 minutes)

11:48 – 12:39 7/8 CLASS (51 minutes)

11:48 – 12:39 7/8 CLASS (51 minutes)

PERIOD 9

12:43 – 1:34 (51 minutes)

PERIOD 10

1:38 – 2:29 (51 minutes)

12:09 – 12:39 LUNCH

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MISSION STATEMENT OUR VISION:

Our vision is to become a community of students, faculty, and staff that values learning, caring, and creativity.

OUR COMMITMENT:

Our commitment to learning means that we aspire to:  create an environment where students want to learn and are able to grow.  develop a range of programs and activities to serve all students.  make students ready, academically and socially, to meet their futures.  challenge students to learn thoughtfully and to solve problems skillfully. Our commitment to caring means that we aspire to:  base our decisions on the best interests of the school community.  lead students to relate to, communicate with, and be tolerant of one another.  foster senses of responsibility and accountability within the community.  encourage students to develop their moral and spiritual values. Our commitment to creativity means that we aspire to:  appreciate and encourage diversity within the community.  seek out creative and novel approaches to problems.  employ a wide range of educational practices and techniques.  encourage students to be resourceful and self-reliant.

OUR BELIEFS:        

All students can learn. Learners possess multiple intelligences. Participation in the learning community fosters social, civic, emotional, and intellectual growth. Diverse instructional strategies and environments enhance learning. Shared vision and shared experiences are the foundation of the school community. The competing goals of excellence and equity produce energizing tension within the community. Problems present opportunities for re-evaluation, growth, and change. Teaching is an art, as well as a craft, and the teacher-student relationship is at its heart.

OUR PILLARS:    

Intellectual Development Life Skill Acquisition Relationship Building Character Growth

21ST CENTURY SKILLS & CHARACTER TRAITS:

The following skills and traits are incorporated in curriculum:  Collaborating and working in teams   Communicating effectively   Critical-thinking skills   Life skills and citizenship   Understanding other cultures 8

Problem-solving skills Work ethic and self-discipline Strong moral character “Professional” writing, speaking, and reading skills

PURPOSE OF HANDBOOK

The purpose of this handbook is to provide information to help you be successful this school year. As with any large organization of people, a system of rules, regulations, policies, programs, and services have been established to provide a positive and productive culture in our school. Both students and parents are urged to become familiar with the contents of the Student Handbook. We believe students at Theodore Roosevelt High School model common sense, cooperation, leadership, and high standards of personal behavior. While the handbook clearly outlines our expectations for you based on these beliefs, real success by students can only be achieved through a willingness to live up to these expectations. As in real life, the actions you choose to take will result in direct consequences. We stand committed in helping all students live up to their responsibility to our school community. We, as faculty and staff members of Theodore Roosevelt High School, extend a warm welcome and anticipate another great school year!

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ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY:

The Roosevelt faculty and administration have adopted the following Academic Integrity Policy, beginning in the 2002-2003 academic year. Please read it carefully. Each Roosevelt student is expected to do his or her own work, including homework assignments, essays, lab work, exams, and projects. You can be sure of maintaining this academic integrity if you do the following: *** Cite sources from which you directly take any ideas, information, images, your own. *** Cite sources from which you paraphrase anyone else’s ideas in your own words and style. *** Refuse to share your own work or receive the work of others unless approved by the teacher. *** Work with others only when that collaboration has been approved by the teacher. *** Participate fully in collaborative efforts and projects. Failure to follow any of the above constitutes cheating or plagiarism and will not be tolerated. The range of possible consequences will include the following: *** A zero for that work with no makeup credit. *** Grade reduction or failure for the nine-weeks or semester. *** Referral to the unit principal. *** Parent contact and/or conference. *** Suspension and/or expulsion.

AFTER-SCHOOL PROCEDURES:

By 2:50 pm, students are expected to be out of the building and off school grounds, in a designated work area (i.e. cafeteria) or with coaches/advisors in a school-sponsored activity, unless attending a school sponsored activity. Failure to comply will result in disciplinary actions.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Announcements are made daily. Students are expected to be attentive during announcements so they are informed of upcoming events and important school news. Announcements are posted daily on the school website, www.kentschools.net/rhs/.

ARRIVAL/PICK-UP:

Students should be dropped off/picked up at the main entrance off the cafeteria. 9

ASSEMBLIES:

Assemblies and pep rallies are held for several purposes: to teach, to entertain, to honor, to display school spirit, etc. Depending upon the purpose of the assembly, there is a specific type of behavior expected from the audience. First and always, the members of the audience should respect the rights of the performer, speaker, or whomever might be presenting the program. There is an obligation of courtesy that each student at Theodore Roosevelt High School owes other persons in this school. It is our expectation that you respect that obligation and our belief that you are due that level of courtesy in return. You are expected to: 1. Follow assembly instructions as given over the announcements and/or by the emcees. 2. HONOR and RESPECT the dignity of the program. 3. Pep rallies require appropriate audience participation that reflects only positive school spirit. Avoid talking, yelling, clapping, or indicating your approval or disapproval when such is not appropriate. For example, some programs require silence; even at pep rallies, there is a time to cheer and a time to listen. Students not complying with our expectations will be denied attendance at assemblies and will be assigned to in-school monitoring for the duration of future assemblies.

ATTENDANCE POLICY:

When a student is absent from school, state law requires a parent to notify the school by telephone. Call the attendance office at 676-8750 between 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. If a phone call has not been made by a parent or guardian, the student is required to report to the attendance office with a note within ten (10) school days. The parent shall be notified within a reasonable period of time after the determination that the student is absent from school, which time will not be more that two full school days from the date of the student absence. A. Authorized Absences Include: 1. Field Trips/School Business 2. Excused Absences (According to Ohio Law, ORC 3321, the following reasons are recognized as excused: Personal Illness, Illness in the Family, Family Quarantine, Death of a Relative, Religious Holiday, and Emergencies.) 3. In-School Restriction 4. Out-of-School Suspension Students are responsible for lesson(s) and assignments during their absence(s). B. Unauthorized Absence Any absence not covered by the above is considered unauthorized. Students leaving the building without signing out or notification will be reported as unauthorized. C. Excessive Absences Students who accumulate eleven (11) or more absences, authorized or unauthorized, must bring in a doctor’s note for each additional absences after ten (10). If there is no documentation, these absences will be unauthorized and the grade-level administrator may initiate an attendance mediation where a Attendance Improvement Plan may be developed for the student. Extenuating circ*mstances will be handled on a case-by-case basis. D. Returning From An Absence If a phone call has not been made by a parent or guardian, the student is required to report to the attendance office with a note within ten (10) school days. The absence will be classified as authorized or unauthorized at that time. E. Extended Medical Absences Home Instruction is provided for students at all levels of academic performance who are unable to attend school for a period of time. These absences may include, but are not limited to, illness, injury, post surgery recovery, and/or complications with pregnancy. Parents should contact the student’s School Counselor as soon as possible if their student has an illness that could become lengthy. Home Instruction will be provided at a rate of one hour for every day out of school. If your child were out for 30 days and unable to receive instruction for 10 consecutive days, 30 hours of instruction would be provided in the remaining 20 days. Home Instruction is terminated as soon as the student returns to school. 10

AUDITING COURSES:

The main purpose of auditing a course is to give the student an additional experience in the course and to develop enough background and confidence so that the student may be more proficient in a given area. Auditing must be arranged through the Guidance Office, in consultation with the classroom teacher, prior to the beginning of the school year for a year course and/or prior to the beginning of the semester for a semester course, unless special permission is granted by the classroom teacher. A grade of an “AU” is issued for report card and transcript purposes and no high school credit is awarded.

BUS TRANSPORTATION:

Students may ride only their assigned bus. The bus driver is responsible for the orderly conduct of the students. While on the bus, the student is under the authority of and directly responsible to the bus driver. The bus driver is responsible for reporting, in writing, any misconduct to the Assistant Principal. The Assistant Principal will impose disciplinary action, which may result in the removal of a student from riding a bus. The administrator will inform the student and the student’s parents of the removal. The driver may assign seats to students. Students may be permanently removed from the bus. Board approved Code of Conduct is applied to any infraction that occurs from the bus stop to the school building.

CAFETERIA PROCEDURES:

Courtesy and good manners are expected in the cafeteria. Students should go directly to the end of the line; saving a place in line for a friend is not allowed. Throwing food is NOT permitted. Leave your table clean, throwing away trays, napkins, etc., when you have finished eating.

CARE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY:

Be aware of your school and take pride in it. Try to keep it clean and orderly. If a student writes on a desk or locker, or damages any other property, the student may be required to reimburse the school for the cost of repair or replacement and also be subject to school discipline.

CHEMICAL ABUSE:

The following guidelines will implement the Kent City Board of Education’s Chemical Involvement policy. Using, possessing, purchasing, selling, intending to buy or sell, transmitting having the odor of alcoholic beverages and/or drugs, possessing paraphernalia, or simulating any of the above during a school day or at a school-sponsored activity regardless of the time of day is a violation. Students found in violation of the above will be subject to disciplinary action as described within the Automatic Consequences, Section II, up to and/or including expulsion and referral for prosecution.

CLINIC:

The purpose of the clinic is to provide first aid for minor injuries and sudden illnesses. The clinic is supplied with cots, bandages, splints, and other medical supplies. You must have a pass from a teacher, administrator, or secretary to go to the clinic. The clinic does not stock or dispense any form of medication. Students who leave for appointments or because of illness must receive approval prior to leaving the building from an Administrative Office or the Attendance Office.

COLLEGE CREDIT PLUS PROGRAM

The College Credit Plus Program allows high school students to enroll in nonsectarian courses in approved post high school institutions, full-time or part-time, while still in high school. The first step to the process is attending a MANDATORY parent/student informational meeting at RHS held each year early second semester. Refer to the student planner for specific time and date each school year. Additional guidelines and application procedures are available in the guidance office. Individual colleges and/or universities will provide additional information, requirements, and deadlines on their websites. NOTE: A late materials fine of $25.00 shall be assessed for each student who fails to return by the stated deadline any textbooks/materials purchased by Kent City Schools for College Credit Plus. Appropriate library fines will be assessed for unreturned materials borrowed from the Roosevelt College Credit Plus Library.

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COLLEGE INFORMATION AND TEST DATES FOR 2016-2017:

Nearly every college or university requires the American College Test, (A.C.T.) or Scholastic Aptitude Test (S.A.T.) for admission or placement purposes. These tests are offered at least five times a year and may be retaken. The test dates for the 2016-2017 school year are as follows: ACT Test Dates Register By: September 10, 2016 August 5, 2016 October 22, 2016 September 16, 2016 December 10, 2016 November 4, 2016 February 11, 2017 January 13, 2017 April 8, 2017 March 3, 2017 June 10, 2017 May 5, 2017 SAT Test Dates (anticipated) October 1, 2016 November 5, 2016 December 3, 2016 January 21, 2017 March 11, 2017 May 6, 2017 June 3, 2017 PSAT/NMSQT October 19, 2016 October 14, 2016 AP TESTS May 1-12, 2017 Students preparing for college are strongly advised to consider the following college entrance testing opportunities: 1. The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) is offered in the Fall and is designed for college-bound junior students who wish to enter the National Merit Scholarship competition. The results of the test are used to determine National Merit and National Achievement Semi-Finalists and Commended students and are an excellent forecast of how students might perform on the SAT. College bound sophom*ores are also encouraged to take the test to receive feedback and early diagnostic information about their college academic skills to improve their performance on the SAT. 2. We recommend the ACT or the SAT be taken during their junior year. A college entrance test is required at all colleges and universities throughout the country. It is recommended that a student check the websites of the colleges and universities they are planning on applying to as to what test is best preferred for admissions. 3. SAT Subject Tests are another test component of the College Board Admissions Testing Program. While most colleges require the ACT or SAT, only selective to highly selective colleges require SAT Subject Tests. SAT Subject Tests are given in a number of specific subjects and are generally taken in the spring of the junior year and/or in the fall of the senior year. College handbooks and college catalogs will indicate if achievement tests are required or recommended. It is advisable to take an achievement test after one completes the highest level of study in a specific subject. 4. Advanced Placement tests (AP tests) are part of the College Board Admissions Testing Program. These tests are taken in May by advanced students wishing to earn college credits. Fees are charged by the testing agencies for all tests. Fee waivers are available for eligible students. Theodore Roosevelt High School is a test center for all of these testing programs, except the SAT and SAT Subject Tests. Obtain information and registration forms for all of these tests in the Guidance Office, or register on-line: For ACT- www.act.org. For SAT - www.collegeboard.com.

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CREDIT FLEXIBILITY PLAN:

Kent City Schools’ Credit Flexibility Plan is designed to focus on supporting and accelerating student learning and reflects the need for students’ readiness for careers and college without remediation. Credit Flexibility Options may include: • Test out options • Approved internet-based learning programs • Evening school approved programs • Approved summer learning programs • Approved Student-Designed Proposals. Students complete the Credit Flex Prospectus found in the Credit Flexibility Application packet, which is is available in the guidance office or on-line at www.kentschools.net/rhs-guidance. Submission Dates: All Credit Flexibility Applications must be submitted to the student’s school counselor prior to the experience. Deadlines are: SUMMER PROPOSAL: May 15 FALL PROPOSAL: October 1 SPRING PROPOSAL: February 1

DETENTIONS:

Students who do not observe the rules and regulations of the school and the classroom may be assigned detentions. Students will be assigned detentions for the purpose of preventing an undesirable act from recurring. Teacher detentions may be issued at the discretion of the individual classroom teacher. Administrative detentions may be served from 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. daily.

DISTRIBUTION OF MATERIAL:

The Student Activities Coordinator must be notified if a student wishes to distribute or post written material on school grounds. After review and approval of the material, the Student Activities Coordinator will designate time and location of distribution or posting. Material which is libelous, obscene, offensive, or which may interfere with the educational process is prohibited.

DRESS GUIDELINES:

Theodore Roosevelt High School encourages students to dress and groom themselves in an appropriate manner. Clothing worn to school should be comfortable, clean, and conducive to a business-like atmosphere. Any dress or appearance which clearly constitutes a threat to the health and safety of students or disrupts the educational process is prohibited. Immodest or extreme dress or appearance, of any nature, which causes a disruption to the educational process, will not be permitted. The following guidelines will be in effect: 1. Shoes or sandals must be worn at all times. 2. Tops which expose midriff or torso are NOT permitted. 3. Strapless tops are NOT permitted. 4. Reasonable length shorts and skirts are permitted. “Short” shorts and skirts are NOT permitted. Shorts and skirts are expected to be school appropriate and of non-revealing length. 5. Sunglasses are not permitted to be worn inside the school. 6. Clothing with lettering or illustrations which are literally, or by implication, religiously, racially, ethnically, or sexually insulting or disrespectful, and/or obscene is NOT permitted. 9. Beer, alcohol, or drug related clothing and jewelry are NOT permitted. 10. Martial arts paraphernalia is NOT permitted on school property. 11. Hats or other head coverings, or coats (outerwear) are NOT permitted. 12. Pocket chains are NOT permitted. 13. “Droops” pants are NOT permitted. 14. Undergarments are to be worn but should NOT be visible. Students who do not comply with the above guidelines may be sent home to change clothing and/or be disciplined.

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DRIVING & PARKING POLICY:

Driving is a privilege extended to predominantly juniors and seniors. Cars must be registered in the Cashier’s Office. Students must show their driver’s license. Parking at Roosevelt for the 2016-2017 school year will be $50.00, payable upon registration. Theodore Roosevelt High School students are to park in the designated student parking lot on the south side of Roosevelt Drive or stadium parking lot on the west side of the building. Only registered cars are permitted during the school day. Freshmen are not permitted to drive to school. Sophom*ores will be approved on an individual basis and as parking spaces are available. Students who do not have parking permits displayed or who are not parked in student designated parking areas, may be subject to having their driving privileges suspended or other disciplinary action. All students must obey traffic laws. A speed limit of 10 M.P.H. is to be observed on school property. Students are NOT PERMITTED to park in the faculty lot or the pool lot. All vehicles parked on school property are subject to the rules/regulations of RHS and may be searched at any time. See Appendix A on Search and Seizure. NO vehicle will be parked without a current parking sticker. Students are prohibited from eating, smoking, sitting in or loitering around any cars on school grounds during the school day. Temporary parking permits will be issued at the discretion of the TRHS administration. These permits will be issued sparingly and only when special circ*mstances are present. Requests for a temporary permit must be made to a TRHS administrator. The school accepts no responsibility or liability or loss occurring to a vehicle on school grounds. Please lock your car whenever you are on campus. Driving privileges may be suspended or revoked if the student is habitually tardy to school. No refunds will be given if driving privileges are revoked or suspended as a result of disciplinary action. Driving to school is a privilege. Parking permits may be suspended or withdrawn, without reimbursem*nt, should there be a violation of any school rule.

EARLY GRADUATION:

Students seeking early graduation should confer with their school counselor and follow the procedures outlined below: A. Application Procedure: 1. Student meets with their school counselor to assure all requirements are met and that early graduation is feasible. 2. Student and their parent/guardian must have a consultation with the appropriate school counselor and principal to be sure all parties agree. During the consultation, an early graduation form is completed and signed by all parties present. 3. The student’s progress will be monitored by the student and school counselor to assure that all graduation requirements are met prior to the projected graduation date. B. Early Graduation Filing Deadlines: 1. June graduates (one year early) must complete filing process by no later than September 1 of their junior year (preferably in the late spring of their sophom*ore year). 2. August graduates (after summer school of their junior year) must complete the filing process by February 1 of their junior year. 3. January graduates (one semester early) must complete the filing process by September 1 of their senior year. 4. Early graduation depends on the successful completion of required courses and all other requirements placed upon the student. Permission to graduate early may be rescinded at any time by parent/guardian and student in agreement with the principal.

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ELECTIONS POLICY:

The Student Council Election Committee is responsible for planning and facilitating the elections of the Student Council President, Student Council Representatives, and Class Officers (president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer). NOTE: Elections are held in the spring of each school year for Freshmen, Sophom*ores, and Juniors to select a new set of class officers for the following school year. Just because a person is elected as officer one year does not guarantee he/she would be elected to serve as officer another year. It is also responsible for the elections of Student Council Representatives and Class Officers for the incoming freshmen class. These elections will take place at Theodore Roosevelt High School in early fall. Please read carefully the following Theodore Roosevelt High School Election Policies that govern the election process. Policy Concerning Number of Offices to be Held by one Student: A. A student may hold only one major position per school year. Exceptions to this policy should be considered and approved by the Student Activities Coordinator. B. A major position shall be defined as any office of any Roosevelt student club or organization: 1. The Presidency of any club or organization 2. The Vice-Presidency of any club or organization 3. The Treasurer of any club or organization 4. The Secretary of any club or organization 5. The Editor in Chief of the Colonel 6. The Editor in Chief of the Yearbook C. FRESHMAN POLICY - When holding a Freshman Class Officer position, a student cannot: • Chair any event sponsored by the freshman class. A class officer may sit on any committee. D. SOPhom*oRE POLICY - When holding a Sophom*ore Class Officer position, a student cannot: • Chair the concession stand committee during any sports season. (NOTE: Sophom*ores who chair the concessions committee may not chair any other class-related events during the same season of chairmanship.) E. JUNIOR POLICY - When holding a Junior Class Officer position, a student cannot: • Hold the position of Prom Chair. (NOTE: Juniors who hold the position of Prom Chair cannot hold the position of Class Officer, Silent Auction Chair, or chair for any major class-related event when Prom events have been initiated.) • Hold the position of Silent Auction Chair. (NOTE: Juniors who chair the position of Silent Auction Chair cannot hold the position of Prom Chair, Class Officer, or chair for any major class-related event while chairing the Silent Auction.) • Chair any other class-related events, as determined by class advisors and class officers. F. SENIOR POLICY - When holding a Senior Class Officer position, a student cannot: • Chair any major class-related events. • NOTE:  Seniors who hold the position of Class Officer may hold a position on the Leadership Retreat Planning Committee and may participate in additional clubs.  Seniors who hold a position on the Leadership Retreat Planning Committee cannot chair any major class-related events.  Please be aware of your officer commitment(s) if you are planning on taking post-secondary classes. Likewise, you should communicate regularly with your advisors and fellow officers to better serve your class.

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Policy Concerning ELIGIBILITY for an Office: A. You must have passed all subjects the previous semester. B. You must have a minimum of a 2.25 grade point average for the nine weeks grading period preceding the election. Also, you must maintain a minimum of a 2.25 grade point average each nine weeks while in office. C. You must not be on probation in the designated class or activity. D. In order to run for student council president, a student must have been a member of student council for one year prior to the year running for said office. This requirement will also be applied to the appointed student council officers. E. In case of a timeline overlap in the process to elect student council president, student council representatives and class officers, candidates interested in running for more than one office (i.e.-student council president and class officer or student council president and representative) must file intent-to-run forms, fulfill all requirements and meet all deadlines for each office sought. Policy Concerning CAMPAIGNS, SPEECHES, and SIGNS: All candidates are required to follow the election policy concerning campaigns, speeches and signs. Failure to do so will result in disqualification from the election. Be sure to note policies regarding voting, ties, results and office vacancies, as well. A. CAMPAIGNS • It is the responsibility of each candidate to conduct his or her campaign in good taste. Candidates may choose to develop appropriate campaign themes or slogans. Total campaign expenditures are limited to $10 per candidate. B. SPEECHES 1. Speeches are required of candidates running for Student Council President and Class Office. 2. All speech preparation requirements and deadlines must be met. Failure to comply results in disqualification from the election process. C. SIGNS 1. Signs must be attractive and in good taste and may not put down any other candidate. Each sign must include: a) Full name of candidate b) Date of election c) Name of office d) Grade level of office 2. Candidates may post up to 10 campaign signs. This includes small or large poster board signs, 8 1/2 X 11 paper signs, banners and t-shirts. 3. Use of school paper and copy equipment is prohibited. This includes the use of large bulletin board paper and any Xerox paper from AVS. 4. The use of campaign stickers is prohibited. 5. Candidates must provide their own tape. You must use PAINTERS tape. 6. Approved posting areas for election campaign signs include (refer to the Posting Guidelines handout posted in the Activities Office): a) Above hallway drinking fountains (8½ x 11 size only) b) On large open tile wall spaces c) On general hallway bulletin boards (Note: bulletin boards in the cafeteria area are for Booster use only.) 7. Candidates must remove all signs and tape, leaving surfaces clear, prior to leaving the building on the day of the election.

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Policies Concerning VOTING, TIES, RESULTS, & CLASS OFFICE VACANCIES: A. VOTING 1. In order to be elected as Student Council President or Class Officer, the winning candidate must obtain a majority (over 50%) of the total vote. If no candidate receives a majority vote, a run-off will be held between the top two candidates. 2. In order to assure a fair elections process, the Student Council Election Committee will maintain a neutral voting site. Therefore, no campaigning may be conducted in the cafeteria atrium on voting day. B. TIES 1. In case of a tie vote for the office of Student Council President, a tiebreaker election will be held. 2. In case of a tie vote for the position of Student Council Representative, the tie will stand. 3. In case of a tie vote for any Class Office (i.e.-President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer), the Class Advisor will make the decision as to whether the tie will stand or be broken by a tiebreaker election. C. RESULTS 1. Election results will be tabulated by the Student Council advisor, Student Activities Coordinator, and/or his/her faculty designee. 2. Vote tallies will not be released to anyone. D. CLASS OFFICE VACANCIES • In the case that no one runs for a particular Class Office position (i.e.-President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer), the decisions about how to best fill the vacancy and the method for the selection process will be the responsibility of the Class or Club Advisor. Request for final approval of a student holding more than one office should be submitted to the Student Activities Coordinator for review PRIOR to the student filling the office vacancy.

ELECTRONIC DEVICES:

Cell phones, audio/video devices, and other electronic devices may not disrupt the classroom or school setting. Devices may be collected by teachers to maintain the integrity of the academic setting. Additionally, there shall be no expectation of privacy with regard to electronic devices. Any device turned in to administration could be held until the end of the school day and returned to the student and/or parent/guardian. TRHS is not responsible for any lost electronic devices if students choose to bring them to school. Cell phones and personal electronics along with any attachments, i.e. headphones, except may NOT be used or in view anywhere in the building with the exception of the hallways or cafeteria area, unless directed by a faculty member for curricular purposes. Personal speakers, both internal and external, should NOT be used at any time, unless directed by a faculty member for curricular purposes. Any type of video recording without prior permission from students, staff, or administration is prohibited at all times, unless used for the benefit of school safety and brought immediately to the attention of the administration. (see KCS Student Code of Conduct 18u for additional specifics related to recording devices). At any time, administration has the authority to prohibit the privilege of using personal electronic devices if deemed necessary.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL AUTHORIZATION FORMS:

It is vitally important that all EMA forms are returned at the beginning of the school year. In an emergency situation, students cannot be transported to or treated at a hospital without this form. The information on the form is often the only source of correct phone numbers for a student. When a student is ill, he/she cannot be released to go home unless a parent or emergency number can be contacted.

EMERGENCY SCHOOL CLOSING:

In the event of school closing due to snow or other emergencies, students will find accurate information on local tv/radio news stations, including WNIR 100.1 FM, News Channel 5, and FOX 8 WJW. You may be notified by the Parent Broadcast System as well.

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EIGHTEEN-YEAR-OLD OR OLDER STUDENTS:

Students who are 18 years or older are expected to follow the same attendance rules and regulations as other students. Because of its desire to serve the educational needs of all students, Theodore Roosevelt High School regularly admits students no longer of compulsory age (over eighteen) who desire to re-enroll in order to complete their education. Theodore Roosevelt High School will accept such students only if those students show serious educational intent. Serious educational intent is defined as: regularly attending all classes, demonstrating reasonable school behavior, and showing a willingness to conscientiously complete the assignments and requirements of each course. A required enrollment meeting that includes the student, appropriate school counselor, and unit principal to develop the student’s plan of study will be held prior to the student officially being enrolled. Should a student 18 years old or older fail to show serious educational intent, the student may be withdrawn from school. In order for the withdrawal to be accomplished, administration must give the student adequate warning that expectations are not being met and withdrawal is a possibility. If such notice is given and the student still does not show serious educational intent, the appropriate assistant principal may recommend to the principal that the student be withdrawn. Should the student not agree with the decision, an appeal could be made to the high school principal. Form for Self-Supporting Status - Students over eighteen years of age are still considered to be under the supervision of their parents unless they can verify that they are regularly employed and that they pay rent/utilities. Students requesting self-supporting status should see an assistant principal.

EXAMS:

Final examinations are to be given in all courses at the end of the first and second semesters. All students are to take exams regardless of fees owed or books returned. The dates and times of examinations will be published by the administration. FIRST SEMESTER EXAMS SECOND SEMESTER EXAMS (finals for both year-long courses and semester (midterms for year long courses; finals for semester courses) courses) • Weds, December 19, 2016 • Monday, May 22, 2017 • Thurs., December 20, 2016 • Tuesday, May 23, 2017 • Fri., December 21, 2016 (last day of • Wednesday, May 24, 2017 (last day of 4th 2nd Grading Period/2nd Sem.) Grading Period/2nd Sem.) The philosophy of final examinations dictates that they are to be given only at the time they are scheduled. No semester or final exams may be taken early without administrative approval. Excuses to be absent from final examinations must be obtained from the appropriate assistant principal at least one week (five school days) prior to the examination. Such excuses are strongly discouraged but if granted, examinations will be taken after the scheduled final examination. If a student fails to report for a final examination and fails to make-up the exam, the teacher will give that student a 0% on the exam for the course. Seniors who need a passing grade on a final exam to achieve a passing grade in the course, are required to take a final exam. Teachers may choose to give final exams to seniors in their courses. All students, including all seniors and January graduates, must take semester exams in January.

FEES:

Students will be notified of fees for classes during the first month of school. All fees for classes should be paid as soon as possible. Fees are to be paid in the CASHIER’S Office. Payment plans are available. When fees are not paid, report cards will be withheld, and final transcripts/diplomas will be withheld. Students who have completed a Free Lunch form and been approved must complete a Fee Waiver form each academic year in order for their school fees to be waived.

FERPA AND DIRECTORY INFORMATION:

Ex. 1 - The school district follows the guidelines of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) regarding all student records. Parents who do not want directory information for their child released to colleges, universities, and military recruiters should contact the guidance office. Ex. 2 - The exception to disclosure of student information without consent is the release of “directory information.” The district will make the information listed below as directory information available upon a legitimate request unless a parent/guardian or student 18 years or older notifies the school in writing by September 15 of each school year that (s)he will not permit distribution of the following information. Under Ohio law, directory information includes the following: • student name • address 18

• • • • • • • •

telephone listing date and place of birth major field of study participation in officially recognized activities and sports weight and height of members of athletic teams dates of attendance date of graduation awards received

FIRE DRILLS:

The fire drill is an important process that requires all of our attention. Everyone is expected to exit the building during a fire drill. The only exceptions are faculty and staff members on the Protect-in-Place team and permanently or temporarily disabled students on the second floor. The protect-in-place location is by the east stairwell by room 209.

FLEX ELIGIBILITY (SENIORS ONLY):

Flex Pass is a “privilege” offered to SENIORS in good standing. To be considered for a Flex Pass, students must meet the criteria below and return a completed application (available in the Main Office), with appropriate signatures, to Ms. Lyndee Wolf’s Main Office mailbox. Students must complete a new application for any schedule change that occurs after approval. Incomplete or illegible applications will not be processed. A student must have the following criteria: • a minimum of 16 ½ credits; • passed all sections of the OGT; • maintain a 2.25 GPA minimum (to be considered for the first grading period, a student should have a cumulative GPA of 2.25); • currently enrolled in a minimum of six (6) classes; • prompt to classes and be in good standing in regard to discipline referrals • maintain minimal tardies and absences Eligibility will be checked at the end of each grading period. NOTE: Students who DO NOT maintain the requirements may have their flex pass revoked by a principal. If a student chooses not to use his/her Flex Pass on a particular day, he/she is expected to be in study hall or student center.

GRADE CLASSIFICATION:

Student eligibility for various student privileges is based on the number of years spent in high school. For purposes of staying on track for the four-year graduation plan, students are encouraged to earn the accumulative minimum credits per school year: Freshman 5.5 earned credits Sophom*ore 11 earned credits Junior 16.5 earned credits Senior 21.5 earned credits

GRADING CRITERIA:

At the beginning of the year, students will be given grading criteria by their individual classroom teachers. Some of these criteria might include homework, participation grades, projects, tests and/or quizzes.

GRADING SYSTEM & PROCEDURES: A - Excellent B - Very Good C - Average D - Below Average F - Failing

S - Satisfactory 0 grade points P - Pass 0 grade points I - Incomplete 0 grade points W - Withdrawn 0 grade points NC - No credit 0 grade points WF - Withdraw Failing 0 grade points AU - Audit 0 grade points NOTE: Plus (+) and minus (-) differentiations are not recorded on permanent records nor are they counted in determining a final grade. 4.0 grade points 3.0 grade points 2.0 grade points 1.0 grade points 0 grade points

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An Incomplete may not be carried for more than one grading period. An Incomplete may not be issued for the last grading period or as a final grade without approval of the principal or his/her designee. Grades are averaged every grading period. The basis for calculating the final grade of a semester course is: First grading period = 40% Second grading period = 40% Semester exam = 20% The basis for calculating the final grade in a year course is: First Semester Average = 50% Second Semester Average = 50% The “trend” of a student’s grade in a course may play a role in calculating a final grade. In cases where the average may go in either direction, a teacher may consider the trend during the latter part of the semester.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:

To qualify for graduation from Theodore Roosevelt High School, students must meet the following requirements:

Subject English Language Arts Mathematics Science

Social Studies

Health Physical Education

Requirements 4 Credits - English 9, 10, 11, 12 4 Credits - Must include Algebra II 3 Credits - Must include 1 credit Physical Science; 1 credit Biology; PLUS 1 credit from Advanced Science: CP Chemistry, CP Physics or Environmental Science; etc. 3 Credits - Must include 1 credit World History or AP Human Geography; 1 credit American History; 1 credit American Government* ½ Credit - Grade 9 1 Credit-2 Semesters - Must include 1 semester of Physical Education for 9th grade and 1 semester of Physical Education in Grades 10, 11, or 12

Fine Arts

**1 Credit

Electives

***5 Credits

TOTAL UNITS

21.5 Credits

Graduation Tests

Class of 2017 must pass all 5 parts of the Ohio Graduation Tests Class of 2018 and beyond will participate in Ohio State Test Assessments

* Integrates Economics and Financial Literacy ** Must include two semesters of Fine Arts. Students taking one credit or one year of a coherent sequential career-technical track of courses that follow a career-technical pathway may replace the fine arts requirement with the courses/credit earned for Theodore Roosevelt High School. *** Excludes Physical Education and Health

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AND Meet one of the following three: 1. Ohio’s State Tests Students earn a cumulative passing score of 18 points, using seven end-of-course state tests. To ensure students are well rounded, they must earn a minimum of four points in math, four points in English and six points across science and social studies. End-of-course exams are: • Algebra I and geometry or their equivalents • Biology • American history and American government • English I (9th Grade) and English II (10th Grade) Students studying Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses in biology, American history or American government may take and substitute test scores for end-of-course state exams to avoid double testing. Students also may substitute grades from College Credit Plus courses in these science and social studies subjects for end-of-course state exams. 2. Industry Credential and Workforce Readiness Students earn 12 points through a State Board of Education-approved, industry-recognized credential or group of credentials in a single career field and achieve a workforce readiness score on the WorkKeys assessment. The state of Ohio will pay one time for those who take the WorkKeys assessment. 3. College Admission Test Students earn “remediation-free” scores in English language arts and mathematics on a nationally recognized college admission exam. The state of Ohio will pay one time for all 11th grade students in the classes of 2018 and beyond to take the exam free of charge.

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DIPLOMA WITH HONORS:

The Honors Diploma is awarded to those students who are pursuing either a college preparatory program of study or a career-technical program of study and who exceed the minimum graduation requirements. A gold sticker stating Honors Diploma is affixed to a student’s diploma and a special insignia appears next to their name in the commencement program.

Diplomas with Honors Criteria Students need to fulfill all but one criterion for either of the following Diplomas with Honors High School Academic Diploma with Honors

Subject

English

Mathematics

Science

Social Studies

Career-Technical Diploma with Honors

4 units

4 units

4 units, including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II or equivalent and another higher level course or a four-year sequence of courses that contain equivalent content

4 units, including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II or equivalent and another higher level course or a four-year sequence of courses that contain equivalent content

4 units, including physics and chemistry

4 units, including two units of advanced science

4 units

4 units

Foreign Language

3 units: i.e., 3 units of one language or 2 Not counted toward requirements units each of two languages

Fine Arts

1 unit

Not counted toward requirements

CareerTechnical

Not counted toward requirements, and may not be used to meet requirements

Now counted in Electives

Not counted toward requirements

4 units of Career-Technical minimum. Program must lead to an industry-recognized credential, apprenticeship, or be part of an articulated career pathway, which can lead to post-secondary credit

3.5 on a 4.0 scale

3.5 on a 4.0 scale

Electives

Grade Point Average

ACT/SAT Score 27 ACT (excluding writing 1210 SAT sections) Additional Assessment

Not applicable

27 ACT 1210 SAT

Achieve proficiency benchmark established for appropriate Ohio Career-Technical Competency Assessment or equivalent

Diploma with Honors requirements pre-suppose completion of all high school diploma requirements in Ohio Revised Code.

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HALL TRAFFIC:

Students are not permitted in the halls during class time without an official hall pass. This is considered loitering. Students violating this policy will be disciplined. This is to keep noise to a minimum and to create a positive environment for classroom instruction.

HARASSMENT:

Conduct constituting harassment may take different forms, including but not limited to the following: Sexual Harassment A. Verbal: The making of written or oral sexual innuendoes, suggestive comments, jokes of sexual nature, sexual propositions, or threats to a fellow student, staff member, or other person associated with the District. B. Nonverbal: Causing the placement of sexually suggestive objects, pictures, or graphic commentaries in the school environment or the making of sexually suggestive or insulting gestures, sounds, leering, whistling, and the like to a fellow student, staff member, or other person associated with the District. C. Physical Contact: Threatening or causing unwanted touching, contact, or attempts at same, including patting, pinching, pushing the body, or coerced sexual intercourse, with a fellow student, staff member, or other person associated with the District. Gender/Ethnic/Religious/Disability/Height/Weight Harassment A. Verbal: 1. Written or oral innuendoes, comments, jokes, insults, threats, or disparaging remarks concerning a person’s gender, national origin, religious beliefs, etc., toward a fellow student, staff member, or other person associated with the District. 2. Conducting a “campaign of silence” toward a fellow student, staff member, or other person associated with the District by refusing to have any form of social interaction with the person. B. Nonverbal: Placing objects, pictures, or graphic commentaries in the school environment or making insulting or threatening gestures toward a fellow student, staff member, or other person associated with the District. C. Physical: Any intimidating or disparaging action such as hitting, hissing, or spitting on a fellow student, staff member, or other person associated with the District. Any student who believes that she/he is the victim of any of the above actions or has observed such actions taken by another should contact a staff member or administration. Some forms of sexual harassment of a student by another student may be considered a form of child abuse which would require that the student abuser be reported to proper authorities in compliance with State law. See Appendix B of this handbook.

HAZING:

The Board of Education believes that hazing activities of any type are inconsistent with the educational process and prohibits all such activities at any time in school facilities, on school property, and at any school sponsored events. Hazing shall be defined for purposes of this policy as performing any act or coercing another, including the victim, to perform any act of initiation into any class, team, or organization that causes or creates a substantial risk of causing mental or physical harm. Permission, consent, or assumption of risk by an individual subjected to hazing shall not lessen the prohibitions contained in this policy. Administrators, faculty members, and other employees of the School District shall be alert particularly to possible situations, circ*mstances, or events which might include hazing. If hazing or planned hazing is discovered, the students involved shall be informed by the discoverer of the prohibitions contained in this policy and shall be ordered to end all hazing activities or planned activities immediately. All hazing incidents shall be reported immediately to the Superintendent. Students, administrators, faculty members, and other employees who fail to abide by this policy may be subject to disciplinary action and may be held personally liable for civil and criminal penalties in accordance with law. 23

HOMEWORK:

Homework is incorporated as an integral part of the instructional program. Homework may be requested from the Attendance Office when a student is absent from school for three days or more. Appropriate grade level counselor will be notified.

HONOR AND MERIT ROLL:

To qualify for both the Honor and Merit Roll, a student must be enrolled in a minimum of six (6) credit-earning courses. A student must have a 3.5 cumulative average and no failing grade or incomplete in any subject to qualify for the honor roll. The merit roll includes students earning a cumulative average of 3.0-3.499.

ILLNESS WHILE IN SCHOOL:

If a student becomes ill during the school day and cannot attend classes, we will use the phone number provided on the Emergency Medical Authorization form (EMA). We will not permit a child to go home unless a contact has been made with a parent/guardian. No student is to go home without first talking with the school nurse and/or the appropriate unit office. Failure to do so may result in an unauthorized absence. EMA’s are essential when sending home a student who has become ill during school hours, for field trips and emergencies. Please return EMA’s at the beginning of the school year.

IMMUNIZATION:

Each student should have the immunizations required by law or have an authorized waiver. If a student does not have the necessary shots or waivers, the Principal will remove the student or require compliance with a set deadline. This is for the safety of all students and in accordance with State law. Any questions about immunizations or waivers should be directed to the Student Services Office. Requirements: Unless given a waiver, students must meet the following:

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VACCINES

FALL 2016 IMMUNIZATIONS for School Attendance

DTaP/DT Tdap/Td Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis

Kindergarten: Four(4 or more of DTaP or DT, or any combination. If all four doses were given before the 4th birthday, a fifth dose is required. If the fourth dose was administered at least six months after the third dose, and on or after the fourth birthday, a fifth dose is not required. Grades 1-12: Four (4) or more of DTaP or DT, or any combination. Three (3) doses of Td or a combination of Td and Tdap is the minimum acceptable for children age seven and up. Grades 7-12: One (1) dose of Tdap vaccine must be administered prior to entry.

POLIO

K-6: Three (3) or more doses of IPV. The FINAL dose must be administered on or after the fourth birthday regardless of the number of previous doses. If a combination of OPV and IPV was received, four (4) doses of either vaccine are required. Grades 7-12: Three (3) or more doses of IPV or OPV. If the third dose of either series was received prior to the fourth birthday, a fourth dose is required. If a combination of OPV and IPV was received, four doses of either vaccine are required.

MMR Measles, Mumps, Rubella

K-12: Two (2) doses of MMR. Dose one must be administered on or after the first birthday. The second dose must be administered at least 28 days after the first dose.

HEP B Hepatitis B

K-12: Three (3) doses of Hepatitis B. The second dose must be administered at least 28 days after the first dose. The third dose must be given at least 16 weeks after the first dose and at least eight weeks after the second dose. The last dose in the series (third or fourth dose) must not be administered before age 24 weeks.

Varicella Chickenpox

K-6: Two (2) doses of varicella vaccine must be administered prior to entry. Dose one must be administered on or after the first birthday. The second dose should be administered at least three months after the first dose; however, if the second dose is administered at least 28 days after first dose, it is considered valid. Grades 7-10: One (1) dose of Varicella vaccine must be administered on or after the first birthday.

MCV4 Meningitis

Grade 7: One (1) dose of meningococcal (serogroup A, C, W, and Y) vaccine must be administered prior to entry. Grade 12: Two (2) doses of meningococcal (serogroup A, C, W, and Y) vaccine must be administered prior to entry.

INCOMPLETE GRADE(S):

An Incomplete grade(s) “I” is designed to be used for students who are absent from school for a length of time that prohibits them from completing the required work in a course(s) prior to the end of the established grading period. The number of days allowed for completion of make-up work or make-up tests in a class is equivalent to the number of days of excused absences. The length of the make-up time may not be shortened or extended without administrative approval. If a student receives an “I” grade for the grading period due to an extended excused absence, he/she is responsible for contacting his/her teacher(s) to arrange due dates for make-up work so a grade can be issued to replace the “I” grade. Incompletes NOT made up by the end of the next grading period will be changed to an “F”. Students who are issued an incomplete grade(s) for a grading period are ineligible for inclusion on the Honor Roll/Merit Roll.

INITIATING CHANGE:

Students who wish to initiate a change in policy or procedure or to present an idea that will benefit the school should put it in writing and submit it to one of the administrators.

INSURANCE FOR STUDENTS/ATHLETES:

Insurance is available to students and student athletes through a private contractor. Forms are available in the Main Office and the Board Office. The policy is between the parent (or) guardian and the private contractor. All communication should be directed to the company.

INTERIM REPORTS:

In addition to Progress Book for parents and students, interim reports are issued at the mid-point of each grading period. These are provided as a communication tool between the teacher and the home. All students will receive interim reports from each of their classes mid-way through the grading period.

LEAVING BUILDING/SCHOOL GROUNDS:

Leaving the building or school grounds at any time during the school day without authorization is not permitted. School day begins when a student arrives on school property, including arrival by bus. Refer to the Student Conduct Code and to the Automatic Consequences. Students who leave for appointments or because of illness must receive approval prior to leaving the building from an Administrative Office or the Attendance Office.

LOCKERS:

On the first day of school, each student is assigned a locker. This locker is provided for books, outerwear/coats, and supplies. Lockers are provided as a convenience for students. Each student shall be held responsible for the condition of his or her locker. Lockers should be kept clean and in good order at all times: - nothing on outside of locker - no permanent marking inside of the locker - the student will be responsible for removing any decorations or objects, i.e., shelves, pictures, at the close of the school year - offensive materials are not permitted - no contact paper Lockers are to be kept locked! No money or any other valuables (ring, watch, etc.) should be left in any locker. Do not give your combination to other students. Sharing a locker is strongly discouraged. Because lockers are the property of the Board of Education, the lockers and the contents thereof are subject to random searches at any time without regard to any reasonable suspicion. Locker clean out and inspection will be scheduled at the end of each semester. See Appendix A, Search and Seizure, in this handbook.

LOITERING:

Loitering on private or public property adjacent to school property or on school property before, during, or after school is prohibited and disciplinary action will follow. This includes being in the hall when class is in session. Students not involved in after-school athletics or activities have until 2:55 pm to exit the building.

LOST AND FOUND:

If you find an article, take it to the Lost & Found located in the Main Office. If you have lost an article, including a textbook, inquire at the Main Office about it.

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MAKE-UP WORK:

Students who have authorized or unauthorized absences, including In-School and Out-of-School Suspensions, will be given the work covered and receive full credit. The usual number of days allowed for completion of make-up work is equivalent to the number of days absent. An extension of time may be granted by the teacher or an administrator for lengthy absences and other extenuating circ*mstances. The make-up time may not be shortened. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange make-up work with the teacher. When a student is going to be out of school for three or more days and is able to do work, call the Attendance Office for assignments. Please allow 24 hours for teachers to prepare the assignments. If a student cuts a class, he/she must complete the work missed, but the credit for the work will be determined by the teacher and administrator.

MEDIA CENTER POLICIES AND PROCEDURES:

A. Roosevelt Media Center (RMC) Hours: The RMC is open from 7:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. B. Media Center Use: All students are welcome in the Media Center. Juniors and Seniors from student center and Freshmen and Sophom*ores from study halls need to report to student center and study halls first for attendance purposes. Student center students who want to come to the Media Center may do so. All students must sign in. Attendance from these lists will be reported back to student center and study halls. All students using the Media Center during lunch periods 4, 6, or 8, must have a pass from an academic teacher. If students are not reading/working constructively, they will return to study hall/student center/lunch. Students with FLEX are welcome if they sign in and are reading/working constructively. Media Center rules will be in effect at all times. C. Media Center Rules: 1. Consumption of food or beverages is not permitted. 2. Students must be constructively reading/working the entire period. 3. If a student needs to leave the RMC for restroom, locker, etc., a pass must be secured from RMC personnel. 4. Game playing on the computers or anywhere else is not allowed. No audio sounds from computers are permitted unless under teacher supervision. 5. The RMC is not to be used as a hallway/cut-through. 6. Furniture is not to be moved unless under teacher supervision. Chairs are to remain flat on the floor. Maximum of one person per computer/chair and maximum of four people per table unless under teacher supervision. 7. If a student accumulates six loss of privileges, media center use is denied for the remainder of the year unless under teacher supervision. D. Acceptable Use Policy: Users of the Computer Labs and all RMC computers must follow the Acceptable Use Policy, which has been adopted by the Kent City Schools Board of Education. The Computer Labs are used primarily by classes.

MEDICATIONS:

If medication (prescription or non-prescription) is needed during school-hours, students are to obtain a release form from the school nurse. This form must be completed by the parents and physician and returned along with the medication. Students are NOT permitted to carry medications during the school day or at school events. We are not permitted to dispense or provide any over-the-counter medications without written orders of a doctor and a parent.

MISSING OR ABSENT CHILDREN:

The parent shall be notified within a reasonable period of time after the determination that the student is absent from school, which time will not be more that two full school days from the date of the student absence.

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OHIO GRADUATION TEST:

A graduation criteria that must be met for students in Class of 2017 is passage of all five (5) sections of the Ohio Graduation Test. Any student who does not graduate with the Class of 2017 will have to meet the graduation requirements for the Class of 2018. Class of 2018 and beyond will participate in the Ohio State Test assessments determined by the State of Ohio. Refer to Graduation Requirements for additional information.

PEPPER GAS:

Pepper gas, mace, stink bombs and other similar substances are regarded as disruptive devices. Students who display and/or set off those substances in school or at any school function will be subject to suspension and/or possible expulsion.

POLICE INVOLVEMENT:

Police will be notified in the event of the following: 1) possession of controlled substances/illegal drugs/paraphernalia 2) possession of weapons 3) theft of property over $50.00 4) civil disobedience 5) assault/fighting.

PRINCIPAL’S SCHOLAR AWARD:

The Principal’s Scholar Award recognizes students who have demonstrated outstanding academic excellence in their course work throughout the school year. The award qualifications are: the first three grading periods must equate to a 3.5 or higher cumulative grade point average or an overall cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher for the school year. Students are then recognized for their high academic achievement in the spring at the Scholar & Achievement Program.

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SPEECH THERAPIST AID:

A school psychologist and speech therapist are available to help students. Referral should be made through the special education department.

RANK IN CLASS:

For the Class of 2017 and 2018: All students, with the exception of the Valedictorian and Salutatorian, will be recognized using the Latin tiered system listed below. Currently, there are two factors, which determine the rank in class at Theodore Roosevelt High School: academic excellence and a well-rounded curriculum. Academic excellence is determined by superior grades, and a well-rounded curriculum means the number of courses successfully completed. FORMULA TO DETERMINE VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN FOR THE CLASS OF 2017 and 2018 ONLY: Grade Point Average (GPA) x 25 + total credits (which count toward rank in class) + AP points and/or College Credit Plus (CCP) points = Index Number. The index numbers are ranked from highest to lowest (carried out to the third decimal place index), with the highest number considered the number one ranked student in the class. The following procedures are used to arrive at the Index Number to identify the Valedictorian and Salutatorian: 1. All courses are used in calculating the cumulative GPA. 2. To determine the Total Credits used to calculate the Index Number, all credits that are earned from courses offered and taken at Theodore Roosevelt High School during the regular school year will be applied. The regular school year is defined as seven class periods per day - with an additional class period set aside for lunch. Student may earn no more than one (1) additional credit per year applied to the calculation for Valedictorian and Salutatorian, as defined in number 3 below. 3. High School equivalent courses taken during the middle school and included on the high school transcript are included in the calculation of GPA; however, those credits are not applied toward the calculation of class rank. 4. A student may apply no more than eight (8) credits toward the Total Credits in any one school year. The KCS Credit Flexibility Plan refers to those educational experiences that may be approved, in accordance with board policy, to supplement the student’s regular school program. A. The regular Roosevelt classroom and day is defined as coursework taken from the first day of school in August to the last day of school in May, during the number of periods offered during the school day, and classes approved through the College Credit Plus program. B. A student is not permitted to take two classes in the same class period. C. Roosevelt summer school is NOT defined as part of the regular Roosevelt classroom. 27

5. For purposes of ranking, Advanced Placement (AP) courses will be awarded an additional one (1) point toward the calculated index number at the conclusion of the first semester. 6. The final class rank to determine valedictorian and salutatorian is established at the conclusion of the third nine-week grading period of the senior year. 7. Roosevelt Summer School is assigned to a grade level as follows: A. Summer School before and after ninth grade + ninth grade = Ninth Grade Year. B. Summer School after tenth grade + tenth grade = Tenth Grade Year. C. Summer School after eleventh grade+ eleventh grade = Eleventh Grade Year. 8. Transfer students’ credits will be evaluated and adjusted according to the Theodore Roosevelt High School class rank procedures. 9. Students may not receive credit twice toward class rank for any course taken a second time except for band, choir, orchestra, yearbook, newspaper, physical education, or counselor-approved courses. 10. Grades earned under the College Credit Plus Program count toward class rank under OPTION B. A. Pass/fail will not count toward total credits. Converting a college course to Carnegie units will be applied accordingly: 5 semester hours = 1 credit 4 semester hours = 1 credit 3 semester hours = 1 credit 2 semester hours = .66 credit 1 semester hour = .33 credit B. A college course which offers less than .33 semester credit hours does not count toward class rank. C. A student may not combine two college courses in order to reach minimum requirements for high school credit. D. Each student must provide proper grade releases and/or official grades for GPA and Valedictorian and Salutatorian calculations. The Guidance Office must receive this information within the first week after the semester or quarter in which the coursework was taken. 11. Students will be awarded an additional one (1) point toward the calculated index number (for purposes of Valedictorian and Salutatorian calculations) if they take 1.) Advanced Placement (AP) and/or 2.) College Credit Plus (CCP) courses in disciplines for which RHS offers an AP course. Only those courses earning one (1) full credit are considered in awarding the extra point. 12. Students who are enrolled in an additional year of high school in order to complete graduation requirements will not be ranked. Beginning with the Class Of 2019: Students will use only the Latin System. All students will be recognized after seven (7) semesters of high school coursework for their academic achievement based on their cumulative GPA. The following tiered system will be utilized: 4.0 GPA Summa Cum Laude 3.75-3.99 GPA Magna Cum Laude 3.5-3.74 GPA Cum Laude

RETAKING COURSES:

You may retake a course to add depth to your understanding or to improve your grade. Credit will be granted only once, but the higher grade received will be recorded and the overall grade-point average re-calculated. See your school counselor for further information.

SCHEDULE CHANGES:

Each student is required to take a minimum of six (6) classes each semester. A significant amount of time is spent each year in assisting each student to identify a proper listing of courses for the following school year. Students may make adjustments during a designated week in August for one of the following reasons: 1. Computer error on the schedule. 2. Study hall/or some subjects not balanced each semester. 3. Add a course during a study hall. 4. Course listed on schedule that was taken in summer school. 28

Students in all grade levels may add a class in place of a study period during the first eight (8) school days of either semester. Students may drop a class, without penalty, up to 8 days in a semester course and a year-long course. After this period of time, a WF (withdraw fail) will reflect on a student’s transcript. Under special circ*mstances, a student may be withdrawn from a course after 8 days without penalty of a WF. Steps to follow for handling course level adjustments: Step 1 : Course level adjustments can be initiated by parent, student, or teacher. Step 2 : Teacher/student communicates with parent to be sure all three parties agree. Step 3 : Student obtains Change of Course form from the teacher; teacher/student then submits Change of Course form with appropriate signatures. Step 4 : If appropriate, department chair sees counselor to determine which course best suits the student’s needs; department chair then informs that teacher of adjustment. Step 5 : Student brings slip to guidance and returns books. Guidance adjusts schedule. If a student or parent questions a placement, contact with the appropriate school counselor will initiate a review. Administrators and/or school counselors may recommend moves because of needed adjustments. If a student does not meet the prerequisite for the course, the teacher should notify the appropriate school counselor.

SCHOOL COUNSELING PROGRAM FOR 2016-2017:

School Counselors: Counselor - 9th grade: Mr. Randy Kline Counselor - 10th grade: Mr. Aaron Carlton Counselor - 11th grade: Mrs. Deborah Rutzky (Dept Chair) Counselor - 12th grade: Mrs. Shannon Cooper The School Counseling Program at Theodore Roosevelt High School seeks to support the efforts of parents, teachers, and administrators by providing students with appropriate help relative to their personal-social development, their educational development, and their career development. The School Counseling Program can best be explained by two terms: Guidance and Counseling: GUIDANCE refers to the distribution of pertinent information regarding a student’s educational, personal-social, and career development. COUNSELING describes a close working relationship that develops between a highly skilled school counselor and a student or group of students where personal developmental issues are explored. Also included at all levels are parents, teachers, school administrators, and appropriate community agencies. A unified approach is stressed in handling important student-related concerns. Many questions and needs are of the quick informational type that any of the School Counselors or Guidance Secretary can help without the necessity of an appointment. However, to speak with a School Counselor about a concern or need, simply come to the School Counseling Office and make an appointment with the Guidance Secretary for one of your free periods. If you do not have a study hall, the Guidance Secretary will help you determine a class time that would be least disruptive to your current academic progress. If you have an emergency, inform the Guidance Secretary and she will arrange for you to see your school counselor or another school counselor immediately. Students should see their assigned counselor when formulating their academic schedule; however, students should feel free to request a meeting with any school counselor regarding their personal concerns. You will also find in our School Counseling Department university catalogs, numerous school directories, pamphlets/brochures on personal/social issues, a computer assisted career and educational program, and people to help you find what you need. The School Counseling Department maintains a current website that includes useful information on college admissions and scholarships. Visit our site at http://www.kentschools.net/rhs-guidance/. The School Counseling Department offers website information for our students to conduct career, college/technical training, scholarship searches and college test preparation for the PSAT, SAT and ACT.

SMOKING/TOBACCO:

Smoking is not permitted anywhere on the school grounds. As a result of Board policy, all school buildings in the Kent City Schools District are smoke free environments. (See Appendix “C”)

ACTIVITIES PARTICIPATION CONSEQUENCES:

Students may be denied participation in school activities as part of disciplinary consequences. (See Co-Curricular Conduct Code)

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SPORTSMANSHIP:

Good sportsmanship is expected of all Theodore Roosevelt High School students. Roosevelt High School encourages students to support our teams with enthusiasm and to be courteous to our opponents and their fans. Remember, they are our guests. The sportsmanship displayed by RHS has a great deal to do with the way others feel toward our school. Failure to display good sportsmanship may result in disciplinary action.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES

(See Guide in back of this Handbook.)

STUDENT ATHLETICS

(See Guide in back of this Handbook.)

STUDENT BEHAVIOR:

The exercise of self-control, self-discipline, and self-direction are essential to positive school behavior and success in the future. The school has an obligation to observe and respect the rights of individual students and the student body as a whole, and attempt to maintain a safe environment for all. As with any organization, cooperation and the observation of the rights of others are essential if the goals of the organization are to be accomplished. To this end, each student is responsible for his/her own behavior and must respect the rights of others. See Student Conduct Code in this handbook for specific guidelines.

STUDENT CENTER:

Junior and senior students may be assigned to study hall or student center dependent upon the availability of supervision. Any student not cooperating with the Student Center teacher will be assigned to a supervised study hall. Freshmen and sophom*ores are assigned to study hall only.

STUDENT COUNCIL:

Student Council is for ANYONE who wants a chance to make a difference. Leadership workshops including Nationals and States are offered all year. The student body is governed by the Student Council. Student Council is the place where ideas can become real if we put the work behind it! Students who are not elected representatives may serve as auxiliary members by attending Tuesday meetings during lunch periods.

STUDENTS ENTERING BUILDING:

Once first period has started at 7:30 a.m., ALL STUDENTS must enter the building through the MAIN ENTRANCE (CAFETERIA) DOORS. Students who arrive between 7:30 a.m. and 8:15 a.m. will report to the main entrance desk. Students who arrive after 8:15 a.m. are expected to sign in at the cafeteria doors, then report to the Main Office to sign in and receive their pass to class.

STUDY HALL:

All ninth and tenth grade students who are not in a class are assigned to a study hall and expected to accomplish the following guidelines: A. Be in the study hall prior to the tardy bell. B. Bring to study hall materials to read and/or study, such as writing utensil, paper, and/or reading. C. Maintain silence unless permission is granted from the teacher to work with another student. D. Remain in your seat unless permission is granted by the teacher to leave. E. Sleeping is not permitted. F. Students will not be permitted to leave on a daily or regular basis. G. Card playing, personal electronic devices (i.e. cell phones), food, and drink are prohibited.

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS:

Substitute teachers are to be accorded the same respect as regular classroom teachers. Any student failing to maintain a proper relationship with a substitute teacher will be dealt with according to the Student Conduct Code. The responsibility is on the student to treat a substitute with the respect and courtesy that is due all persons at Theodore Roosevelt High School.

SUSPENDED/EXPELLED STUDENTS:

Students who have been suspended out of school or expelled from school are not permitted on school property or at any school-sponsored event home or away for the duration of such disciplinary action. 30

SUSPENSION APPEAL:

As parent, guardian, or custodian, you have the right to appeal the suspension to the Kent Board of Education’s designee, Assistant Superintendent, Tom Larkin, at the Kent Board Office (330-676-7600). You also have the right to be represented in all proceedings, to be granted a hearing before the board’s designee in order to be heard against the suspension and to request that the hearing be held in executive session.

TARDINESS:

Students are expected to be in class on time each and every day. A student may be considered tardy to class if he/she is not in their assigned classroom at the sound of the bell. Teachers may expect additional responsibilities from students, such as being in their seats when the bell rings. Classroom tardiness will be addressed and resolved by the teachers. Consequences may vary among teachers. Students arriving to school after 7:30 a.m. must sign in at a designated area when entering the building. Excessive tardies will be referred to the appropriate unit office for administrative discipline. Students will be assigned consequences for excessive tardiness.

TEXTBOOKS:

Students shall be assessed fines for the loss or damage to textbooks. Textbooks that are lost or not returned will be assessed at the replacement cost. If the book needs to be rebound, a fee will be assessed. Other damages will be assessed on an individual basis. These fees must be paid before participation in graduation is permitted.

THEFT OF PROPERTY:

Any theft of property should be reported to a school administrator. A police report will be considered by the administrator’s office if the theft is over $60.00.

TORNADO DRILL:

In case of a tornado warning, you will be alerted by a warble sound on the public-address system. Windows on the northeast side of the building should be opened. Each teacher and room has instructions for students to proceed to designated areas within the building away from the glass windows. You should lie face down against the wall, draw your knees under you, cover the back of your head with your arms and remain quiet for further directions.

VISITORS:

Parents and alumni are always welcome to visit our school. Visitors MUST ENTER through the MAIN ENTRANCE (CAFETERIA) DOORS. All other doors will be locked from the outside at 7:30 a.m., the beginning of each school day. Every visitor must first sign in at the desk by the cafeteria entrance and wear a visitor’s badge. Student visitors are not permitted at Theodore Roosevelt High School.

WITHDRAW FAIL (WF):

Students who withdraw from any course after the first eight (8) days will receive a WF for the course. A WF recorded on the transcript will be treated as a “0” when computing the overall grade point average. Under special circ*mstances, a student may be withdrawn from a course after 8 days without penalty of a WF.

WITHDRAWAL FROM SCHOOL:

Ohio Revised Code identifies the process for withdrawing from school. A student must meet with his/her grade-level counselor prior to beginning the process. Withdrawing from School and/or Transferring Schools: After a conference with the school counselor, A. A parent/guarding must pick up and complete the necessary forms from the guidance secretary. A student MUST continue attending his/her daily class schedule until being officially enrolled in another school. B. A student must obtain the teacher-librarian card from the guidance secretary and receive signatures by all concerned. C. A student must pay any fines and fees owed. D. A parent/guardian must sign transcript release form. E. A student must clean out locker and return any remaining textbooks to the Guidance Office.

WORK CERTIFICATE (WORK PERMIT, AGE AND SCHOOLING CERTIFICATE):

Anyone who has not yet reached his/her eighteenth birthday needs a certificate for any regular job, either full-time or part-time. Applications are available in the Principal’s Office.

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STUDENT CONDUCT CODE KENT CITY SCHOOLS

The Board of Education has adopted the following Student Conduct Code. The Code includes the types of misconduct that will subject a student to disciplinary action. The Board has also adopted the list of behaviors and the terms contained in the list. The Kent City School District will attempt to provide a safe and orderly learning environment for all students. Certain student actions may not be compatible with the words “safe” and “orderly.” Discipline is within the sound discretion of the School’s staff and administration. Due process ensures that disciplinary action is imposed only after review of the facts and/or special circ*mstances of the situation. The following outline provides a list of major areas that could result in disciplinary action. An explanation of each behavior and possible consequence follows the list. The absence of a behavior or any specific action from the list does not mean that such conduct does not violate the discipline code or cannot be punished. A. The exercise of self-control, self-discipline, and self-direction are essential to positive school behavior and success in the future. The school has an obligation to observe and respect the rights of individual students and the student body as a whole. As with any organization, co-operation and the observation of the rights of others are essential if the goals of the organization are to be accomplished. To this end, each pupil must be responsible for his/her own behavior and must respect the rights of others. B. The following types of offenses by students of the Kent City School District may lead to disciplinary action which may include detention, social suspension, Saturday School assignment, in-school suspension, out-of-school suspension, or expulsion: 1. TRUANCY Unexcused absence from school. 2. Unassigned EMIS code at this time. 3. FIGHTING/VIOLENCE Contributing to, encouraging, or engaging in disruptive behavior including, but not limited to, fighting. Intentionally, negligently, recklessly, or carelessly causing physical injury or behaving in such a way that could threaten to cause physical injury to another. 4. VANDALISM/ARSON (SCHOOL OR PERSONAL PROPERTY) Intentional, negligent, or careless defacing, damaging, or desecration of private or public property on school premises or at any school activity on or off school grounds. Setting or use of any unauthorized fire or acting in such a manner that might cause a fire. 5. THEFT (SCHOOL OR PERSONAL PROPERTY) Theft of property. 6. USE/POSSESSION/SALE OF A FIREARM Use, possession, or sale and/or threatened use of a firearm or any device that could propel a projectile or object that could cause harm. 7. USE/POSSESSION/SALE OF A DANGEROUS WEAPON OTHER THAN A FIREARM OR EXPLOSIVE OR INCENDIARY OR POISON Use, possession, or sale and/or threatened use of any object or a dangerous weapon other than a gun or explosive that can reasonably be considered a dangerous instrument. 8. USE/POSSESSION/SALE OF ANY EXPLOSIVE, INCENDIARY OR POISON GAS Use, possession, or sale and/or threatened use of any explosive, incendiary or poison gas. 9. USE/POSSESSION/SALE OF TOBACCO Use, possession, or sale of tobacco and/or look-alike products, including smoking of any substance, possessing or using smoking materials, including electronic cigarettes. 10. USE/POSSESSION/SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Using, possessing, purchasing, selling, intending to buy or sell, or transmitting alcohol or simulated alcohol; having the odor of alcoholic beverages upon his or her breath or clothing; or possessing alcohol, on school property or on school vehicles, during a school day or at a school-sponsored activity regardless of the time of day is a violation. Students are also prohibited from school grounds, on school vehicles, or from attendance at any school-sponsored event after the use of or alcohol. 32

11. USE/POSSESSION/SALE OF OTHER DRUGS OTHER THAN TOBACCO OR ALCOHOL Using, possessing, purchasing, selling, intending to buy or sell, or transmitting drugs or simulated drugs; having the odor of drugs upon his or her breath or clothing; or possessing drug paraphernalia, on school property or on school vehicles, during a school day or at a school-sponsored activity regardless of the time of day is a violation. Students are also prohibited from school grounds, on school vehicles, or from attendance at any school-sponsored event after the use of drugs. 12. Unassigned EMIS code at this time. 13. Unassigned EMIS code at this time. 14. FALSE ALARMS/BOMB THREATS Wrongfully discharging or attempting to discharge an alarm system; falsely reporting an emergency, including a bomb threat. 15. Unassigned EMIS code at this time. 16. Unassigned EMIS code at this time. 17. Unassigned EMIS code at this time. 18. BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS/DISRUPTION OF SCHOOL a. Disrupting school or causing or attempting to cause the disruption or obstruction of any lawful mission, process, or function of the school, including any school-sponsored activity, by violence, force, noise, coercion, threat, intimidation, passive resistance, or other disorderly conduct, or urging other students to disrupt or to obstruct the process or function of school by the use of same. b. Intentional disobedience, disrespect, issuing threats. c. Intentionally giving incorrect information to faculty, staff, or other employees of the District. d. Gambling. e. Cheating. f. Plagiarism g. Tardiness. h. Throwing foods, liquids, or any article in the cafeteria. i. The unauthorized throwing of any object, including snowballs. j. Commission of an immoral act. k. Loitering, littering, or causing a disturbance on public or private property during the school day or at a school activity. l. Violations of the school dress code. m. Willful violation of the student responsibilities as may be established by the Kent Board of Education. n. Using the name or identity of another person (verbally or in writing); falsifying times, dates, grades, addresses, or other data on correspondence directed to school personnel. o. Inappropriate public display of affection. p. Display or distribution of unauthorized material in school, on school property, or at school-related activities. q. Attempting to gain entrance for self or others to school activities without paying admission. r. Entering another’s desk or locker or using another’s property without authorized permission. s. Trespassing on private property adjoining, adjacent to, or within the line of sight of school property before, during, or after school. t. Unauthorized use of disruptive devices including, but not limited to, pagers, beepers and other electronic or manual devices. u. Inappropriate use of technology: Students are not permitted to video, photograph, or record other students, staff, or school events in a way that could be detrimental or embarrassing to the school or the people being filmed or recorded. Examples of this could include, but are not limited to, video taping a fight, someone changing in the locker room, a student being bullied, etc. v. Lack of serious educational intent (e.g., failure to submit homework assignments, sleeping in class, etc.). 33

19.

20. 21. 22.

23. 24. 25.

26. 27. 28. 29.

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w. Repeated violation or repeated misbehavior. x. Failure to serve consequence. HARASSMENT/INTIMIDATION Any act that includes: a. Use of racial, ethnic, religious, or sexual slurs. b. Hazing, teasing, bullying, or acting to intimidate. c. Sexual and other forms of harassment (includes writing, drawing, gestures, words, taking, reproducing, possessing, sharing, disseminating, or saving images of a sexual, sensitive, or derogatory nature on a mobile or stationary electronic device, touching, and other forms of harassment). O.R.C. 3313.666 defines “harassment, intimidation, or bullying” as “any intentional written, verbal, or physical act that a student has exhibited toward another particular student more than once and the behavior both: (1) Causes mental or physical harm to the other student; (2) Is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it creates an intimidating, threatening, or abusive educational environment for the other student.” Such behavior is prohibited on school property or at school events. Cyber-bullying, defined as the above prohibited behavior perpetrated with computers, cellular phones, Internet websites, and/or any other electronic device, also is prohibited. In addition, cyber-bullying is not limited to where the bullying originates but also includes where it is communicated on school property or at school events. USE/POSSESSION/SALE OF FIREARM LOOK-A-LIKES. Use/possession/sale or threatened use of firearm look-a-likes. UNWELCOME SEXUAL CONTACT Unwelcome sexual contact. SERIOUS BODILY INJURY TO ONESELF OR OTHERS An incident that results in serious bodily injury to oneself or others. Serious Bodily Injury is defined as “A bodily injury that involves substantial risk of death; extreme physical pain; protracted and obvious disfigurement; or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member, organ or faculty” (18 U.S.C. Section 1365(3)(h)). INSUBORDINATION Insubordination or failure to respond and/or otherwise ignoring a reasonable request from faculty, staff, or other employees of the District. HARMFUL BEHAVIOR Acting to cause mental, emotional, or physical harm to another person, including insensitive or inflammatory language. LEAVING SCHOOL WITHOUT PERMISSION Leaving school or assigned educational location prior to specified dismissal time without official permission and/or transporting on or off school premises other students who have no permission to leave school. School day begins when the student arrives on school property, including arrival by bus. Physical/verbal assault against a student Assaulting another student by words, hands, feet, fist, or by use of an object which could cause physical and/or emotional harm to another person. Physical/verbal assault against a school employee Assaulting an employee by words, hands, feet, fist, or by use of an object which could cause physical and/or emotional harm to the employee. INDUCING PANIC Creating a situation which could make others believe an emergency is in progress when in fact there may or may not be an emergency. VULGAR LANGUAGE Use of offensive or vulgar language or gestures.

30. VIOLATION OF STATUTES Violation of federal, state, or local statutes or ordinances regardless of the existence of a criminal charge and/or conviction. Violation of prohibitions identified in Rule #9, #10, and #11 above (viz., tobacco, alcoholic beverages, and other drugs other than tobacco or alcohol) shall be evaluated on the basis of the infraction date with a rolling 24-month period previous to the infraction. No form of violence, disruptive or inappropriate behavior, nor excessive truancy (which is more than 10 days of unexcused absence), will be tolerated. The foregoing acts of misconduct are prohibited on all school property, going to and from school by foot or vehicle, and at all school-sponsored functions and activities on and off campus. In the event a student is cited for multiple offenses, the commission of any one of the foregoing offenses shall be sufficient to result in any of the possible disciplinary actions. In the event of negligent or willful property damage, reimbursem*nt of the cost of replacement thereof shall be borne by the student and/or his or her parents or guardian. C. In addition to the offenses listed above, each building principal may develop an additional list of offenses appropriate to that building. Such additional list of offenses shall be made known to the students in such ways as may be appropriate to the age and maturity of the students involved. In addition, the Board of Education, on August 26, 1982, reviewed and reaffirmed the following policies which have been in effect for a number of years: Maintenance of Orderly Conduct The Board of Education expects that students will conduct them-selves in keeping with their level of maturity, acting with due regard for the supervisory authority vested by the Board in all district employees, for the educational purpose underlying all school activities, for the widely shared use of school property, and for the rights and welfare of other students. The Board of Education expects that all employees of the district will share responsibility for supervising the behavior of students and for seeing that they meet the standards of conduct which have been or may hereafter be established by the Board or its agents. In each instance in which an employee acts to help a student con-duct himself properly, emphasis is to be placed upon the development of the student’s ability to discipline himself. Pupil/Teacher Relationships Pupils are expected at all times to show evidence of respect for their teachers. Teachers are expected to show evidence of respect for their pupils and to demand respect for themselves. Pupil Dress A student’s dress and appearance become of concern to school authorities if and when that dress and appearance tend to disrupt the work of a class. Therefore, ill-fitting or inappropriate dress or unusual appearance cannot be tolerated at school. If, in the opinion of the principal, a student’s dress and appearance detract from the effectiveness of work in a class or in other ways are an undesirable influence upon other students, the principal will direct the offending student to dress in a proper manner and to present an appearance not offending to others. No student may wear items which are obscene or drug/alcohol related, or demonstrate or suggest racial, ethnic, sexual or religious disrespect. Safety Students are to observe all safety practices and procedures set forth by administrators and teachers. Board Support The Board of Education supports teachers and administrators in maintaining of proper behavior among students.

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT - KENT CITY SCHOOLS - BOE APPROVAL DATES Revised 8/26/82, 3/21/83, 8/18/86, 8/17/87, 7/18/88, 7/16/90, 5/19/92, 7/19/94, 10/18/94, 8/16/95, 8/20/96, 8/19/97, 2011

Reviewed 6/89, 5/21/91, 5/18/93, 5/15/01, 07/13/04, 05/10/05, 04/17/07, 3/15/16

Approved 8/30/76, 7/21/98, 7/20/99, 6/19/01, 07/13/04, 06/21/05, 05/16/06, 05/15/07, 04/20/11, 4/16/13, 6/17/14, 4/21/15, 4/19/16 35

AUTOMATIC CONSEQUENCES

Students who violate any section of the Student Conduct Code can be disciplined according to the nature and seriousness of the violation. Possible discipline for violation can range from a warning to a recommendation for expulsion from school. The following are nine areas of violations that produce automatic consequences: I. The consequences for a violation of Student Conduct Code offense # 10 and/or # 11 (with the exception of transmitting, selling, etc., under II below) shall be as follows: A. First Offense - At a meeting of the parent(s) or guardian(s), student, and school administrator, one of the following options shall be chosen by the student, parent, and administrator: OPTION #1 - The student shall be suspended for not more than ten (10) days out of school suspension. OPTION #2 - Within ten (10) days from the date of the offense, the student and his or her parent(s) or guardian(s) must consent to a school- approved alcohol and/or drug assessment, AND must comply with ALL recommendations from the assessing authority. In addition, all the following must be completed: a. The student agrees to serve three days out of school suspension, AND: b. The student agrees to participate in a school approved alcohol and/or drug assessment program, and follow all recommendations AND: c. The student agrees to follow the recommendations of the school approved alcohol and/or drug assessment. NOTE: If the student and parent/guardian do not complete all items under #2 above, then #1 will be enforced. Also time lines for item 2a., 2b. and 2c. shall be established with the student and parent/guardian by the administrator. Depending on the circ*mstances of the violation, the police may be contacted, and the matter may be referred to them for disposition. B. Second Offense - Within a Twenty-four month period of the First Offense: The student shall be suspended for not more than ten (10) days out of school with recommendation for expulsion. The principal, for any offense under this provision, shall have the right to refer the student to the Portage County Juvenile authorities for prosecution of any offense that may be a crime under the Ohio law. II. Sale, possession for sale, or transmitting alcohol and/or chemicals. The automatic consequence for these offenses is a ten-day out-of-school suspension plus a court referral and recommendation for expulsion. In the event a situation arises which is not clearly defined in the above statements, administration will make a determination based on the intent of the Kent City Schools’ philosophy which states that it is not appropriate for students to use alcohol and/or chemicals. III. Possession of Tobacco and/or look alike products, including smoking of any substance, including electronic cigarettes 1. First Offense - Ten (10) Day Out-of-School Suspension from school - If the student and parent choose for the student to participate in a smoking cessation program, the student will be assigned to three days of out-of-school suspension in lieu of the ten-day out-of-school suspension. Failure to complete the cessation program will result in the reinstatement of the ten-day out-of- school suspension. 2. Subsequent Offenses - Ten (10) Day Out-of-School Suspension and/or a recommendation for expulsion. IV. Fighting in school, on school property, or at a school activity. The consequence for fighting ranges from three to ten days of out-of-school suspension. Consequences for repeated violations may be more severe and may result in possible recommendation for expulsion.

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V. Unauthorized out of building during classes/assigned lunch period/assigned study hall 1. First Offense - This will result in a three day in-school restriction. 2. Second Offense - This will result in a three day out-of-school suspension. 3. Third Offense - This will result in a five day out-of-school suspension. 4. Fourth Offense - This will result in ten days out-of-school suspension with recommendation for expulsion. VI. Driving unauthorized students off campus. 1. First Offense - This will result in a loss of driving privileges for up to eighteen weeks. 2. Second Offense - This will result in three days of suspension plus loss of driving privileges for the remainder of the school year. 3. Third Offense - This will result in five days of suspension, loss of driving privileges for the remainder of the current school year, and loss of driving privileges for the next school year. VII. Possession of a weapon A weapon includes conventional objects like guns, pellet guns, knives, or club-type implements. It may also include any toy that is presented as a real weapon or reacted to as a real weapon or an object converted from its original use to an object used to threaten or injure another. This includes, but is not limited to, padlocks, pens, pencils, chains, jewelry, and so on. Criminal charges may be filed for the violation. Possession of a weapon will subject a student to expulsion for one year and possible permanent exclusion. Under Federal Law, a firearm is defined as any weapon, including a starter gun, which will, or is designed to, or may readily be converted to, expel a projectile by the action of an explosive, the frame or receiver of any such weapon, any firearm muffler or silencer, or any destructive device. A destructive device includes, but is not limited to, any explosive, incendiary, or poison gas, bomb, grenade, rocket having a propellant charge of more than four (4) ounces, missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more that one-quarter ounce, mine, or other similar device. A knife is defined as any cutting instrument consisting of at least one sharp blade. Possession of any such weapon requires the Superintendent to expel a student for a calendar year. Weapons violations will result in a suspension with a recommendation for expulsion to follow. VIII. Wrongful discharge of the alarm system This will result in police notification plus five days of out-of-school suspension. IX. Releasing or discharging disruptive devices (e.g. stink bombs, smoke bombs, mace, pepper gas, etc.) This will result in five days of out-of-school suspension and possible police referral.

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POLICY BOARD OF EDUCATION KENT CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

APPENDIX A SEARCH AND SEIZURE

STUDENTS 5771 - 1 PAGE

The Board of Education recognizes that the privacy of students or their belongings may not be violated by unreasonable search and seizure and directs that no student be searched without reasonable suspicion of a violation of the student conduct code or a criminal offense. Students are not to be searched in an unreasonable manner. The Board acknowledges the need for in-school storage of student possessions and shall provide storage places, including desks and lockers, for that purpose. Such spaces remain the property of the Board and, in accordance with law, may be the subject of random search. Where locks are provided for such places, students may lock them against incursion by other students, but in no such places shall students have such an expectation of privacy as to prevent examination by a school official. The Board directs the school principals to conduct a routine inspection at least annually of all such storage places. The Board of Education hereby declares that the school lockers available for use by pupils are the property of the Board of Education and that the lockers and the contents of all the lockers are subject to random search at any time without regard to whether there is a reasonable suspicion that any locker or its contents contains evidence of a violation of a criminal statute or a school rule. This policy will be posted in a conspicuous place in each school building that has lockers available for use by pupils. School authorities are charged with the responsibility of safeguarding the safety and well-being of the students in their care. In the discharge of that responsibility, school authorities may search the person or property, including vehicles, of a student, with or without the student’s consent, whenever they reasonably suspect that the search is required to discover evidence of a violation of law or of school rules. The extent of the search will be governed by the seriousness of the alleged infraction and the student’s age. This authorization to search shall also apply to all situations in which the student is under the jurisdiction of the Board. Administrators are authorized to arrange for the use of a breath-test instrument for the purpose of determining if a student has consumed an alcoholic beverage. It is not necessary for the test to determine blood-alcohol level, since the Board has established a zero tolerance for alcohol use. Search of a student’s physical person or intimate personal clothing shall be conducted by a person of the student’s gender, in the presence of another staff member of the same gender. The Board also authorizes the use of canines, trained in detecting the presence of drugs or devices, when the Superintendent has reasonable suspicion that illegal drugs may be present in a school. This means of detection shall be used only to determine the presence of drugs in locker areas and other places on school property where such substances could be concealed. Canine detection must be conducted in collaboration with law enforcement authorities and is not to be used to search individual students unless a warrant has been obtained prior to the search. The Superintendent shall prepare administrative guidelines to implement this policy.

R.C. 3313.20

U.S. CONSTITUTION, 4TH AMENDMENT

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POLICY BOARD OF EDUCATION KENT CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

APPENDIX B

STUDENTS 5517 - 1 PAGE

SEXUAL AND OTHER FORMS OF HARASSMENT

The Board of Education recognizes that a student has the right to learn In an environment untainted by sexual or other forms of harassment or discrimination. Offensive conduct which has the purpose or effect of unreasonably Interfering with learning performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, discriminatory, or offensive learning environment disrupts the educational process and impedes the legitimate pedagogical concerns of the District. Sexual harassment Includes all unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and verbal or physical contacts of a sexual nature. Other prohibited conduct Includes that which has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile. discriminatory, or offensive learning environment on the basis of gender, religion, race, color, ethnicity, age, and/or disability. The harassment by a student of a staff member or fellow student of this District is strictly forbidden. Any student who is found to have harassed a staff member or student will be subject to discipline in accordance with law and the Code of Conduct. The Superintendent shall establish administrative guidelines which address the conduct prohibited by this policy and describe a reporting procedure. The Superintendent shall ensure that the prohibited conduct and reporting procedures are available to all students and are posted in appropriate places throughout the District. R.C. 4112 42 USC 2000d et seq 42 USC 2000e et seq 29 USC 621 et seq 29 USC Section 794 42 USC Section 12101 et seq 20 USC 1681 et seq

APPENDIX C

TOBACCO AND THE SCHOOL

Effective in March 2001, it is now prohibited by Ohio law for a minor to “use, consume, or possess cigarettes, other tobacco products, or papers used to roll cigarettes.” It is also now prohibited for a minor to assist, pay for or share in the costs of such products. Even though there are some exceptions to this new law, those exceptions would not apply to use or possession of these products at school or school activities. In case students have not yet been informed, a first offense results in: a. mandatory attendance at a smoking education program (if available) and/or b. a fine of up to $100 Upon any subsequent violations the court may: a. increase the fine b. impose up to 20 hours of community service c. suspend driving privileges for up to 30 days Administrators should check to insure that student conduct codes prohibit possession as well as use of any tobacco products. Student handbooks could inform parents and students of the consequences (in addition to the school discipline) that could follow from a violation of this law. The full statute can be found in The Ohio Revised Code Section 2151.87. Administrators should also coordinate enforcement of this law with local police and juvenile court personnel. June, 2001

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POLICY BOARD OF EDUCATION KENT CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

APPENDIX D

STUDENTS 5136/PAGE 1 OF 1

CELL PHONES AND ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION DEVICES

A student may possess a cellular telephone or other electronic communication devices (ECD) in school, on school property, at after school activities and at school-related functions, provided that during school hours and on a school vehicle the cell phone or other ECD remains off unless directed by a member of the professional staff. Also, during school activities when directed by the administrator or sponsor, cell phones and other ECDs shall be turned off and stored away out of sight. The use of cell phones and other ECDs in locker rooms is prohibited. Possession of a cellular telephone or other ECD by a student is a privilege, which may be forfeited by any student who fails to abide by the terms of this policy, or otherwise engages in misuse of this privilege. Violations of this policy may result in disciplinary action against the student which may result in confiscation of the cellular telephone or ECD. The student who possesses a cellular phone or ECD shall assume responsibility for its care. At no time shall the District be responsible for preventing theft, loss or damage to cell phones or ECDs brought onto its property.

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STUDENT GUIDE TO ATHLETICS 2016-2017

CANCELLATION OF ATHLETIC EVENTS DUE TO WEATHER: If Kent City Schools are closed due to inclement weather conditions, Theodore Roosevelt High School athletic events may be postponed or cancelled. During school closings, specific information on sport practices and contests may be obtained by checking the web at www.roughriderathletics.net or following @rriderathletics REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENT-ATHLETE PARTICIPATION: As a student-athlete, you are not eligible to participate in any sport until the following is completed: 1. OHSAA Physical Examination Form 2. Emergency Medical Authorization Form 3. OHSAA Authorization and Consent Form 5. Ohio Department of Health Concussion Form 4. OHSAA Eligibility and Authorization Statement 5. All OHSAA academic eligibility requirements satisfied 6. Attend preseason student-athlete and parent meeting Physical Examinations are valid for one year from the date of the physician’s signature. Emergency Medical Authorizations and OHSAA Eligibility and Authorization Statements and OHSAA Authorization Forms must be completed each academic year. OHSAA AND KENT CITY SCHOOLS ELIGIBILITY: To be academically eligible to participate in athletics, students in grades 9-12, must be currently enrolled in Roosevelt High School and have received passing grades in a minimum of five one credit courses or the equivalent, in the immediately preceding grading period. The Kent City Schools Board of Education’s policy also requires a student to achieve a 2.0 grade point average for the preceding grading period. The eligibility of a student-athlete continues until the start of the fifth school day of the next grading period. Student-athletes who pass five one credit courses or the equivalent but achieve less than a 2.0 grade point average at the end of a grading period may be permitted to participate provided they engage in a structured academic intervention program monitored by the athletic director. The student-athlete must meet the criteria of the academic intervention program to be eligible to participate in the student-athlete’s sport the following week. • Eligibility for each grading period is determined by grades received the preceding grading period. Semester and yearly grades have no effect on eligibility. • A student enrolled in the first grading period after advancement from the eighth grade must have passed a minimum of 5 classes of all classes attempted the preceding grading period in which the student was enrolled. • For athletic eligibility, summer school grades may not be used to substitute for failing grades received in the final grading period of the regular school year or for lack of enough courses taken the preceding grading period. • Students taking post-secondary school courses must comply with these standards. Please see the principal or athletic director if you have questions. Do not change your course schedule or drop a course without first consulting the principal or athletic director to determine whether it will affect your eligibility. OHSAA PRE-SEASON MEETING AND STUDENT-ATHLETE ELIGIBILITY: The Ohio High School Athletic Association requires student-athletes and parents attend a preseason meeting held at Roosevelt High School and receive the publication “Student-Athlete Eligibility Guide” (see information later in Student Guide to Athletics in this Handbook). Take the time to read this publication and become familiar with the eligibility requirements established by the OHSAA. STUDENT-ATHLETE RISK OF PARTICIPATION: All student-athletes and parents or guardians must realize the risk of serious injury, permanent disability or death, which may be a result of athletic participation. Kent City School District will use the following safeguards to make every effort to eliminate injury: • Maintain a continuing education program for coaches to learn the most up-to-date techniques and skills to be taught in their sport. • Instruct all athletes about the dangers of participation in the particular sport. 41

INDIVIDUAL SPORT RULES: Coaches may establish additional rules and regulations for their respective sports. Penalties for rule violations will be designated/handled by their respective coach. Participants and parents will be informed of rules and regulations in writing before the season. ONE-HALF DAY ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS: Student-athletes are required to be in attendance for the last half of the school day in order to be eligible on that day for participation in an athletic practice or contest. If there are special circ*mstances regarding attendance, the student-athlete’s parent or guardian should contact the Athletic Director for consideration of waiving the attendance requirement. SUSPENDED OR EXPELLED STUDENTS: Students who have been suspended out of school or expelled from school are NOT permitted on school property or at any school sponsored event, home or away, for the duration of such disciplinary action. ATHLETIC CONDUCT CODE: The Board of Education believes that co-curricular activities, including interscholastic athletics, can be an important part of a student’s educational experience in Kent City Schools. Because participation in co-curricular activities is a privilege all students may enjoy during good conduct, students may be denied participation from any particular or all co-curricular activities by the Superintendent, Principal, Assistant Principal, Athletic Director or other Administrator, for up to one calendar year. Multiple offenses may lead to denial of participation from co-curricular activities for the balance of the student’s high school career. The period of co-curricular denial of participation may extend, as appropriate, into the subsequent school year at the discretion of the administrator imposing the denial of participation. Due process procedures, including appeal to the Superintendent and/or the Board of Education, do not apply to co-curricular denial of participation and the decision of an authorized administrator shall be final. SCOPE OF THE ATHLETIC CONDUCT CODE: All student-athletes of Theodore Roosevelt High School are to abide by the Kent City Schools Student Conduct Code and the Athletic Conduct Code. Violation of either code may lead to the denial of participation of the teams’ practice(s) and contest(s) or other penalties. • The Athletic Conduct Code goes into effect on the first day of fall sports practices in August and continues until the last day of school for student-athletes participating in a fall sport. • For winter and spring sports athletes, the Athletic Conduct Code goes into effect on the first day of school and is in effect until the last day of school. • The Athletic Conduct Code will be in effect for all athletes for the entire school year and will carry over from the fall to the winter to the spring sports seasons.

AREAS OF DENIAL OF PARTICIPATION:

1. Substance Possession or Use of Tobacco, Alcohol, and/or Drugs: Using, possessing, purchasing, selling, intending to buy or sell, or transmitting tobacco, alcohol or drugs, or simulated tobacco, alcohol or drugs; having the odor of alcoholic beverages and/or drugs upon his or her breath or clothing; or possessing drug paraphernalia, on school property or in school vehicles, during the school day or at a school sponsored activity regardless of the time of day is in violation. Student-athletes are also prohibited from substance possession or use outside the school environment, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, beginning the first day of practice for fall student-athletes and the first day of school for winter and spring student-athletes and proceeding to the last day of school. Consequences: First Offense: Denial of participation from 20% of the scheduled athletic contests. The athletic suspension will begin on the date of the student-athlete and parent/guardian notification or the first contest in the next active season for out of season violations. Subsequent Offenses during the same academic year: Denial of participation from 40% of the scheduled athletic contests. The athletic suspension will begin on the date of the student-athlete and parent/guardian notification or the first contest in the next active season for out of season violations. This offense may include possible dismissal from the team. The student-athlete must meet with the Student Assistance Coordinator and comply with recommendations made by the Student Assistance Coordinator.

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2. Attendance: A student-athlete is required to attend all mandatory activities designated by the coach. Consequences for the first unexcused absence: Minimum - athletic director and coach’s discretion Maximum - sit out two contests. Consequences for the second unexcused absence: Minimum - athletic director and coach’s discretion Maximum - sit out three contests Consequences for the third and subsequent unexcused absence: Minimum - athletic director and coach’s discretion Maximum - removal from team for remainder of the season 3. Insubordination: A student-athlete shall not refuse to comply with a reasonable request, order, or direction of any coach, administrator, or other authorized personnel. Consequences: Minimum - athletic director and coach’s discretion Maximum - removal from team for remainder of the season 4. Profanity or Vulgar Displays: A student-athlete shall not use profane, obscene, or vulgar language. This includes gestures, either nonverbal or written. Consequences: Minimum - athletic director and coach’s discretion Maximum - removal from team for remainder of the season 5. Behavior Unbecoming of a Roosevelt Student-Athlete, including unsportsmanlike conduct or ejection from a contest or event: A student-athlete shall not act in a manner detrimental to the team or Roosevelt High School. Consequences: Minimum - athletic director and coach’s discretion Maximum - removal from team for remainder of the season 6. Hazing: Hazing shall be defined for the purposes of this policy as performing any act or coercing another, including the victim, to perform any act of initiation into any class, team or organization that causes or creates a substantial risk of causing mental or physical harm. Permission, consent or assumption of risk by an individual subjected to hazing shall not lessen the prohibitions contained in this policy. Consequences: Administrative action and/or automatic dismissal from the team TRHS SPORTSMANSHIP PHILOSOPHY & GUIDELINES: The Theodore Roosevelt High School Athletic Department believes that interscholastic competition involving member schools of the Ohio High School Athletic Association should be governed by the basic principles of good sportsmanship. This document has been prepared to insure that all participants have a common understanding of those basic principles. We believe that students should be coached to play to the best of their ability and to understand that to play well is to play honorably. The promotion of sportsmanship is the obligation of all school personnel (principals, athletic directors and coaches) and is directed to the behavior of spectators, coaches and players. An additional component to consider is coaches’ ethics. We believe the development of good sportsmanship through the practice of ethical behavior and moral reasoning is one of the acknowledged objectives of interscholastic athletics. We, therefore, expect school administrators, coaches, athletes, and spectators to know and embrace the following fundamentals of sportsmanship. Respect should be demonstrated for an athletic opponent and for their school at all times. Roosevelt should treat visiting teams and their supporters as guests and accord them the consideration all human beings deserve. Visiting schools should respect the property and dignity of their host school and its athletic teams. Knowledge of and respect for the current rules of the contest should guide the behavior of all participants. Rules are essential for a fair contest. Good sportsmanship suggests the importance of conforming to the spirit as well as the “letter” of the rules.

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All participants should strive to maintain self-control at all times. The desire to win should not be accepted as a reason for abandoning rational behavior. A proper perspective must be maintained by all if the potential educational values of athletic competition are to be realized. All participants should learn to recognize and appreciate skill in performance regardless of affiliation. Recognition of the good performance of an opponent is a demonstration of generosity and good will that is encouraged in all member schools. In order for good sportsmanship to prevail, it is essential that all participants understand their individual responsibilities and expected modes of behavior before, during and after contests. PLAYER EXPECTATIONS: Because players are admired and respected, they exert a great deal of influence over the actions and behavior of the spectators. It is important that players: 1. Treat opponents with the respect that is due them as guests and as fellow human beings. 2. Shake hands with opponents and wish them a good game when appropriate. 3. Exercise self-control at all times, accepting the judgment of the officials as the best judgment they could make given what they know and see. Never argue or make gestures indicating lack of respect for the officials’ judgment. 4. Accept both victory and defeat with pride and compassion. 5. Congratulate opponents in a sincere manner following either victory or defeat. 6. Accept seriously the responsibility and privilege of representing the school and community. PLAYER EJECTION FROM A CONTEST: Any student-athlete ejected for unsportsmanlike conduct or flagrant foul shall be ineligible for all contests for the remainder of that day. In addition, the student-athlete shall be ineligible for all contests at all levels in that sport until two regular season/tournament contests are played at the same level as the ejection (one contest in football). If the ejection occurs in the last contest of the season, the student-athlete shall be ineligible for the same period of time as stated above in the next sport in which the student participates. A student-athlete under suspension may not sit on the team bench, enter the locker room or be affiliated with the team in any way traveling to, during or traveling after the contest(s). A student-athlete who is ejected a second time shall be suspended for the remainder of the season in that sport. A student-athlete who has been ejected for unsportsmanlike conduct for the second time in the season during the last contest shall be ineligible for a period of time/number of contests subject to the discretion of the Commissioner. The period of ineligibility shall commence during the next sport in which the student-athlete participates. All student-athletes participating in the athletic program at Roosevelt High School will be held accountable to the OHSAA player ejection rule. UNSPORTING PLAYER BEHAVIOR: No member of any school-sponsored interscholastic athletics squad shall leave the ‘playing area’ in which a contest is being conducted and enter the spectator area of the facility to engage in any type of conflict - verbal or physical. If a student-athlete leaves the ‘playing area’ and enters the spectator area of a facility to so engage a person, the minimum penalties shall be: 1. The student-athletes privileges to participate in interscholastic athletics shall be revoked and the student-athlete shall be ineligible for the remainder of the school year. 2. The school shall be immediately placed on probation pending an investigation (and report) into what happened, what caused it to happen, what was done by the school to diffuse what happened and what safeguards have been implemented by the school to prevent further happenings. CHEERLEADER EXPECTATIONS: Cheerleaders are representatives of the student body. By setting a good example, the cheerleaders can influence and control the actions of the student spectators. They should: • Establish standards of desirable behavior in keeping with the fundamentals of good sportsmanship for the cheerleaders. • Use positive cheers, which encourage their own team without demeaning their opponents. • Use discretion in deciding when to cheer and which cheers to use. • Give encouragement to injured players on both sides. • Never attempt to distract opposing players or in any way interfere with their performance. • Serve as hosts for visiting cheerleaders.

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Participants (players and cheerleaders) should avoid the following inappropriate behavior: • Taunting officials, opponents or spectators • Violation of bench rule: If an athlete leaves the bench area and is involved in an altercation on the playing field/area, it is strongly recommended that the athlete be suspended for two contests. The suspension should include non-conference and tournament games and should carry over into the next sports season if it occurs at the end of a sports season • Ejection from contest • Use of profanity • Damage/destruction of school property • Theft of school or personal property SPECTATOR EXPECTATIONS: Partisan spectators by their behaviors and reactions determine to a large extent the reputation for sportsmanship of their school. Spectators should be reminded and should keep in mind that athletes are friendly rivals as members of opposing amateur teams. They are expected to be treated as such. Spectators should be reminded too, that the contest should be between the teams engaged in the competition and not between their supporters. It is important that all spectators: • Know and demonstrate the fundamentals of sportsmanship. • Respect, cooperate, and respond enthusiastically to the cheerleaders, coaches, and student-athletes of all teams. • Censure fellow spectators whose behavior is unacceptable. • Be positive toward players and coaches regardless of the outcome of the contest. • Respect the judgment and the professionalism of the officials and coaches. Spectator inappropriate behavior: • Verbal/physical abuse of officials • Berating players, coaches or other spectators through: chants, signs, cheers, and profanity Unacceptable interruptions of a contest: • Throwing objects on playing area • Entering playing area • Disruptive behavior FAN CODE OF CONDUCT: Theodore Roosevelt High School, in association with the Ohio High School Athletic Association promotes interscholastic events and sportsmanship. Sportsmanship is an essential part of any athletic competition and is expected from athletes, coaches, officials and fans. As a fan/spectator of Theodore Roosevelt High School we want you to be an example of positive encouragement while supporting our athletes, coaches and officials. Our behavior should be positive, respectful and encouraging of the athletes, coaches, officials and the game. Failure to be an example of these athletic practices and/or ejection from an athletic contest will result in the following procedures to be taken: First Offense – The spectator will schedule a meeting with the athletic director with resulting action that may include removal form the next two (2) home athletic contests of the same sport. A letter will be sent by the athletic director and principal to the spectator in question notifying them of the ejection and the dates of the ejection. Second Offense – The spectator will be removed from all home athletic contests and other school events and activities for the remainder of the season of infraction. A letter of ejection will be sent from the office of the Principal notifying the spectator of the remainder of the season ejection. Third Offense – The spectator will be removal from all home Kent City School District athletic contests and other school events and activities for the remainder of the school year. A letter of ejection will be sent from the office of the Superintendent notifying the spectator of the ejection. THE STUDENT-ATHLETE AND TRANSFERRING SPORTS: Student-athletes may not transfer from one sport to another after the first scheduled scrimmage or contest. A student-athlete who withdraws from a sport may not join another sport until the season in which he/she withdrew is completed. A student-athlete who withdraws from a sport may not begin conditioning or “open gym or open facilities” for a sport in the up-coming season without permission from the head coach of the sport the student-athlete withdrew from or until the current sport’s season ends. 45

THE STUDENT-ATHLETE AND TWO-SPORT PARTICIPATION: A student-athlete who wishes to participate in two sports during the same season must gain the approval of the athletic director prior to practicing with both sports. The following criteria must be met before approval will be given: 1. Approval from the parent or guardian. 2. The student-athlete shows evidence of strong academic achievement that would not be compromised by participating in two sports in the same season. 3. Both head coaches must agree the student-athlete would be capable of competing at a varsity level in each sport and would be able to have sufficient practice time for skill development. 4. The student-athlete must decide on a primary sport that would take priority if schedule conflicts occur. Both head coaches must agree on the student-athlete’s choice of primary sport. 5. The head athletic trainer must be consulted to determine if any past or current injuries or conditions would make participation in two sports inadvisable. 6. A contract outlining the above criteria must be signed by the parents, coaches, student-athlete, and athletic director. Head coaches will not allow a student-athlete to participate in more than one sport until approved by the athletic director. MARCHING BAND/ATHLETIC POLICY: It is permissible for a student to participate in a fall sport in addition to being a member of the marching band. The marching band director and the head coach of the respective sport will work out a mutually agreeable situation, which permits the student to participate in both activities. CONFLICTS IN CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES: An individual student who attempts to participate in too many co-curricular activities will, undoubtedly, be in a position of a conflict of obligations. The athletic department recognizes that each student should have the opportunity for a broad range of experiences in the area of co-curricular activities; and to this end, will attempt to schedule events in a manner so as to minimize conflicts. Students have a responsibility to do everything they can to avoid a continuous conflict. This would include being cautious about belonging to too many activities where conflicts are bound to happen. It also means notifying the faculty sponsors involved immediately when a conflict does arise. GUIDELINES FOR CUTTING TO A DETERMINED NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS: The head coach will hold a pre-season meeting with student-athletes trying out for the sport to explain the criteria used to cut a squad. Evaluation procedures and general tryout information will be explained and questions pertaining to tryouts will be answered. A conference will be held with a student-athlete cut from the squad. During the conference, the coach will explain the reasons why the student-athlete did not make the team and suggest possible alternatives for improving skills, therefore, enhancing the student-athlete’s opportunity for making the team in the future. The coaching staff will participate in the evaluation of each student-athlete in a given sport in a fair and equitable manner. The head coach will be responsible for making the final decision with respect to the varsity squad of his/her team. Tryouts will be a minimum of two (2) practices in length on two (2) different days before cuts are made to ensure adequate time to evaluate candidates. Every attempt will be made to give each student-athlete the same amount of time to demonstrate skills. Note: Tryouts for cheerleading will follow different criteria. The specific format and selection process will be explained to potential candidates prior to cheerleading tryouts. STUDENT-ATHLETE VACATION POLICY: Vacations by athletic team members during the sport season are extremely discouraged. When an absence due to a vacation is unavoidable, a student-athlete must: • Be accompanied by his/her parents/guardians/custodians while on vacation • Contact the head coach prior to the vacation • Be willing to assume the consequences related to their status on the team as a starter or substitute player, including, but not limited to a reduction in playing time. • Student-athletes missing mandatory contests during a scheduled family vacation will be required to sit out the following number of contests at the coach’s discretion: Miss 1 contest - sit out one contest upon return Miss 2 contests - sit out two contests upon return Miss 3 or more contests - sit out three contests upon return 46

AWAY EVENTS AND STUDENT-ATHLETE TRANSPORTATION: Student-athletes are expected to travel to and from away practices, scrimmages, and contests on transportation provided by Kent City Schools. In the event of extenuating circ*mstances, exceptions may be granted by the athletic director or head coach if the student-athlete provides notification through a written request signed by the parent or guardian the day prior to the scheduled away event. If the request is honored, a student-athlete will be permitted to travel with his/her parent or guardian only. BENCH, TEAM AREA, AND LOCKER ROOM RESTRICTIONS: The bench or team area and locker room of each sport is restricted to the student-athletes listed on the OHSAA eligibility form for the sport, coaches, volunteer coaches, managers, athletic trainers, paramedics, physicians, team videographers or other personnel approved by the athletic director or coach. Students, parents and fans are expected to remain in designated spectator areas or seated in the bleachers. SPORTS AWARDS CEREMONIES: Individual sports awards banquets and ceremonies will be held at the conclusion of each sports season. Student-athletes are expected to attend the awards program to receive the awards they have earned. If the student-athlete is unable to attend the awards program, the head coach must be notified before the awards program or the student-athlete risks forfeiture of earned awards. CRITERIA FOR AWARDS: Head coaches will determine the requirements for a student-athlete to earn a varsity award in his/her respective sport. The individual sports award criteria will be described to student-athletes prior to the start of the sport’s season and are available in the Athletic Handbook.

ROUGH RIDER ATHLETIC AWARDS:

Freshmen - Numerals of graduation year the first season and Certificate of Athletic Participation. Junior Varsity Award - Certificate of Athletic Participation First Year Varsity Award - Varsity “R” letter award for the first season and a sport pin. Second Year Varsity Award – Sport Pin Third Year Varsity Award - Third Year Plaque and a sport pin Fourth Year Varsity Award - Fourth Year Plaque and a sport pin Captain Award - Captain Certificate Suburban League Scholar Athlete Award - Any student-athlete who has earned a varsity award in the current sport and has a 3.5 GPA or better.

FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS AND EQUIPMENT:

Uniforms - In some sports, the athlete will be required to purchase a portion of the game uniform, which will become their property. Equipment - All athletes are responsible for the proper care and security of equipment issued to them. • All equipment issued to a player is to be worn only at practice or scheduled games or scrimmages involving that particular sport. Exceptions must be approved by the coach, such as team members wearing jerseys to school on game days. • Before any item is attached to, added to, removed from, or worn with a uniform that is issued to an athlete for a specific sport, the athlete must secure permission from the coach. • Each athlete is responsible for all equipment issued. Equipment is to be kept clean and in the best possible condition. Theodore Roosevelt High School is not responsible for lost or stolen equipment. Athletes are required to use a lock on athletic lockers to avoid theft. • All athletic equipment is the property of the Board of Education and the Athletic Department, therefore, school equipment may not be taken from the school building for the use of any other organization or for personal use. Any exception must be approved by the athletic director. • All equipment issued to an athlete must be returned or lost equipment paid for within one week of the last contest of the sport. Equipment that is not returned for any reason or is damaged beyond normal wear and tear must be paid for at REPLACEMENT cost. Any athlete who has not returned or paid for lost equipment within one week may be denied the opportunity to participate in athletics until the equipment is returned or payment is made.

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2016-2017 OHSAA STUDENT-ATHLETE ELIGIBILITY GUIDE

Participating in your school’s interscholastic athletics program will provide some of your most memorable and enjoyable moments ever. Your state association, the Ohio High School Athletic Association, has standards that must be met in order to be eligible to compete. The essential eligibility requirements in this publication are only a summary of some of the regulations affecting student eligibility. Most requirements are published in the OHSAA Handbook, which can be found in the offices of your principal and athletic administrator and is posted on the OHSAA web site (www.ohsaa.org). Your school district also has the authority to establish additional academic standards and codes of student or athletic conduct. Any questions you have concerning the OHSAA standards or your athletic eligibility should be reviewed with your school principal or athletic administrator. You should also meet with these administrators EVERY TIME before you change your course schedule or drop a course. Should you transfer schools, you must follow up with your previous school and your new school to ensure that all proper forms have been submitted to the OHSAA. The eligibility standards of the OHSAA have been adopted by the member schools and were accepted by your school when it became an OHSAA member. You are urged, as a student-athlete, to study these standards carefully since you are responsible for compliance with these standards. Best wishes as you learn the valuable lessons that come with your participation in interscholastic athletics! Scholarship: You may attend any public or non-public high school in which you are accepted when you enter high school (grade 9) from a 7th-8th grade school. In order to maintain eligibility for grades 9-12, you must be currently enrolled in a member school and have received passing grades in a minimum of five (5) one credit courses, or the equivalent, in the immediately preceding grading period. Seventh and eighth grade students must be currently enrolled in a member school and have received passing grades in a minimum of five (5) subjects that receive a grade or a pass/fail in the immediately preceding grading period. • A student becomes a member of an interscholastic squad, and thus establishes eligibility, when he/she participates in a contest (scrimmage, preview, or regular season game). • You may not use summer school grades for failing grades received or lack of courses taken in the final grading period. • Your semester or yearly grades have no effect on OHSAA eligibility. • Those taking postsecondary school courses must comply with OHSAA scholarship regulations. • The eligibility or ineligibility of a student continues until the start of the fifth school day of the next grading period, at which time the grades from the immediately preceding grading period become effective. Note: Check with your principal or athletic administrator to determine the exact date that eligibility will be restored. Student-athletes and parents have the opportunity to ask school administrators and/or coaches questions on OHSAA and school eligibility requirements, the school’s Athletic Code of Conduct policy and other issues during preseason meetings that the OHSAA requires schools to hold within two weeks of the beginning of each sports season. Meetings should include showing a DVD prepared by the OHSAA to review key eligibility issues., and discussions on concussion management. Semesters: After establishing ninth-grade eligibility, you are permitted eight (8) semesters of athletic eligibility. • The semesters are taken in order of attendance once ninth-grade eligibility has been established. • Semesters are counted toward eligibility whether you participate in interscholastic athletics or not. • There are exceptions to this regulation, so please arrange a meeting with your principal or athletic administrator to review these exceptions. Age: High school students (grades 9-12) are ineligible for interscholastic athletics on the day they turn 20 years of age. Seventh and eighth-grade students are ineligible for 7th-8th grade athletics if they turn 15 years of age prior to August 1st. • There are exceptions to this regulation, so please arrange a meeting with your principal or athletic administrator to review these exceptions.

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Home Schooling: If you are home schooled and enrolled in an OHSAA member school in accordance with the school’s board-adopted partial enrollment policy, you may be eligible for interscholastic athletics participation at the school where you are enrolled and attending. • To be eligible, you must enter the OHSAA member school from the home school at the beginning of the school year after having been home schooled for at least one calendar year. • Failure to meet the one-year provision will require you to be enrolled for a minimum of one grading period before eligibility can be granted. Transfers: Once you establish your eligibility at a high school, a transfer to a different high school will mean you will be ineligible for athletics for one year from the date of enrollment in the new school. • There are several exceptions to this regulation. To see if you qualify for an exception, you and your parents should arrange a meeting with your principal or athletic administrator. • If your parent or legal guardian lives outside of Ohio, you are ineligible unless one of the exceptions to the regulation is met. These exceptions to the out-of-state residency rules are found in Bylaw 4-6. • If additional questions concerning these regulations remain, school principals or athletic administrators should contact the OHSAA. Awards: You may receive awards valued at $400 or less as a result of athletic participation in interscholastic athletics from any source. You may never accept cash awards, however. Amateurism: You will lose your amateur status and forfeit your eligibility if you: • Compete for money or other monetary compensation. Capitalize on your athletic fame by receiving money, merchandise or services. Receive expenses or compensation from a sponsor unless that sponsor is a recognized amateur governing body or organization, recognized by a member school or is your parent or guardian. • Sign a contract or make a commitment to play professional athletics. • Receive services, merchandize or any form of financial assistance from a professional sports organization. • Compete with a professional athletics team even if no pay is received. • Enter into an agreement with a sports or marketing agent. False Information: If you compete under a name other than your own or provide a false address, you immediately become ineligible. Open Gyms: School officials may designate open gyms or facilities and the sports to be played. You may participate in open gyms or facilities provided: • No one is limited from participating. • No one is required to attend. • No school officials invite selected students or determine the teams. • No school officials transport students to either school or non-school facilities. • No timing or written scoring is kept. • No coaching or instruction is provided. You may be declared ineligible for a maximum of one (1) year for violating these rules. Instruction/Camps: You may attend camps, clinics, and workshops that involve team play any time between June 1 and July 31. • Team play means there is more than one player opposing one player. • There is no limit on the number of students from the same school team that may participate on the same non-school team from June 1 to July 31. You may receive instruction from a coach from a school team only 1). during the season of the sport, or 2). for 10 days only from June 1 to July 31.

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Note: Interscholastic coaches in the individual sports of bowling, golf, gymnastics, swimming & diving and tennis may coach athletes from the school where employed outside the interscholastic season of the sport. Individual skill instruction may be received in any sport by a squad member at any time through individual lessons provided that these individual skill instructions do not violate any Board of Education, school administrators’, or coaches’ policies. Again, however, the school coach may not conduct individual or group lessons for a squad member in a team sport except during June 1 to July 31 and during the season of the sport. Members of a school football team may play in non-contact football contests and attend non-contact team football camps at any time between June 1 and July 31. Remember, however, that the 10-day regulation for instruction from school coaches is in effect. Note: It is a violation if a coach suggests your participation in an instructional program is mandatory. Non-School Teams: A member of an interscholastic squad in a team sport (baseball, basketball, field hockey, football, ice hockey, soccer, softball, and volleyball) may not participate in an athletic contest, tryouts, or any type of team or group training or practices on or with a non-school squad in a team sport in the same sport during the school’s interscholastic season. • In individual sports of bowling, cross country, golf, gymnastics, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field and wrestling, however, you may practice and try out for a non-school team but may not compete in a contest. A member of an interscholastic squad in a team sport (baseball, basketball, field hockey, football, ice hockey, soccer, softball, and volleyball) may try out, practice, and compete on non-school teams before and after the school season provided: 1. The number of students from the same school on the roster of the non-school team is limited to five (5) students in the sports of soccer, field hockey and ice hockey; four (4) students in the sports of baseball and softball; three (3) students in the sport of volleyball, and two (2) students in the sport of basketball. School football team members are prohibited from competing on non-school teams except from June 1 to July 31. Note: Seniors are exempt from these limitations after the conclusion of their sport season. In addition, there is no limit on the number of students from the same school team that may participate on the same non-school team from June 1 to July 31. 2. You have no contact with school coaches while on a non-school team other than the 10 days permitted between June 1 and July 31. • You may be declared ineligible for the remainder of the school season for violating these rules during the school season. • You may be declared ineligible for the next season for violating these rules outside the school season. • A senior may be declared ineligible for the remainder of the school year for violating these rules. Note: Check the OHSAA Sports Regulations (available on the OHSAA web site) for the date you must cease participation on non-school teams in order to be eligible for OHSAA tournament competition along with penalties for non-compliance with this date. Recruiting: You will be declared ineligible if you are recruited by a person or group of persons to change schools or attend a high school for athletic purposes. Any attempt by you to recruit a prospective student-athlete for athletic purposes is also prohibited. A violation may also affect the eligibility of the school team. Alcohol, Tobacco, Drugs: You are prohibited from using any form of alcohol, tobacco or illegal drugs at the playing site of an interscholastic contest. The penalty is disqualification from that contest, and you will likely face additional school and/or legal penalties. Steroids and Performance Enhancing Drugs: If you use anabolic steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs, you are ineligible for interscholastic competition until medical evidence indicates that your system is free of these items. Participation Evaluations and Consent Forms: Each year you must submit a physical examination form signed by a medical examiner before you begin practice for a school sport. In addition, your parents/guardian and you must sign the OHSAA Authorization and Consent Forms. Procedures will be reviewed by school officials. Physical examinations are valid for one year from the date of the exam except for those that take place from May 1-June 1. Those exams are valid for one year plus through the end of the next school year.

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Concussion Management: While all adults involved in the interscholastic athletics program have a responsibility to recognize the potential for catastrophic injury and even death from concussions, it is also the responsibility of student-athletes to recognize the signs, symptoms and behaviors consistent with a concussion. If you have symptoms such as loss of consciousness, headache dizziness, confusion or balance problems, it is your responsibility to report these immediately to your coach and/or health care professional. OHSAA Regulations prohibit a student-athlete who exhibits these symptoms from returning to play until cleared with written authorization by an appropriate health care professional. So remember: don’t hide it… report it. It’s better to miss one game than the whole season. For more information, visit the OHSAA website at www.ohsaa.org/medicine/sportsafety.htm. Sporting Behavior: You are expected to accept seriously the responsibility and privilege of representing your school and community while participating in interscholastic athletics. As a student-athlete, you are expected to: • Treat opponents, coaches and officials with respect. • Display no behavior that could incite fans or other participants in the contest, or which is intended to embarrass, ridicule or demean others under any circ*mstances including on the basis of race, religion, gender or national origin. • Remember that winning isn’t everything. Having fun, improving your skills, making friends and doing your best are also important. The OHSAA has established a policy for students ejected or disqualified for unsporting behavior or flagrant fouls. If you are ejected or disqualified: – You will be ineligible for all contests for the remainder of that day. – You will be ineligible for all contests at all levels in that sport until two regular season/tournament contests are played at the same level as the ejection (one contest in football). If you are ejected or disqualified a second time in a season, you are subject to additional, stiffer penalties, including suspension from play for the remainder of the season in that sport. Note: The complete OHSAA ejection/disqualification policy for unsporting behavior can be found in the OHSAA Handbook and is posted on the OHSAA web site (www.ohsaa.org). Eligibility Checklist: Before you play, you must be eligible. Please review the following checklist with your parents. Unchecked boxes will likely mean you are NOT eligible. For questions, see your principal or athletic administrator. – I am officially enrolled in an OHSAA member high school. – I am enrolled in at least five one credit courses or the equivalent, each of which counts toward graduation. – I received passing grades in at least five one credit courses or the equivalent, each of which count toward graduation, during my last grading period. – I have at least one parent living in Ohio. – I have not changed schools without a corresponding move by my parents or legal guardian or by qualifying for one of the exceptions to the OHSAA transfer regulation. – If I have changed schools (transferred), I have followed up with my previous school and my new school to ensure that all proper forms have been submitted to the OHSAA. – I have not been enrolled in high school for more than eight semesters. – I am not 20 years of age. – I have not received an award, equipment or prize valued at greater than $200 per item. – I am competing under my true name and have provided my school with my correct home address. – I have not competed in a mandatory open gym/facility, conditioning or instructional program. – I have not been coached or provided instruction by a school coach in a team sport or cross-country, track & field, and wrestling other than during my sport season or for no more than 10 days between June 1 and July 31 (applies to team sports only). – I am not competing on a non-school team during my school team’s season. – I have not been recruited to attend this school. – I am not using anabolic steroids or other performance- enhancing drugs. – I have had a physical examination within the past year and it is on file at my school. – My parents and I attended a preseason meeting at my school that the OHSAA requires to be held within two weeks of the beginning of each sports season. – My school reviewed its concussion management protocol and my parents and I reviewed a short presentation on concussions that is available on-line at no cost atwww.nfhslearn.com – My parents and I have signed the OHSAA Authorization Form and the OHSAA Eligibility and Authorization Statement and they are on file at my school. 51

STUDENT GUIDE TO ACTIVITIES 2016-2017 STUDENT GOVERNMENT STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS

President – Kory Nielsen Recording Secretary – Caroline Hannah Corresponding Secretary – Shaun Combs-Bennett

Vice President – Barbara Hickin Treasurer – Lauren Garner

ELECTED STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES

Senior Members: Deklan Barr Junior Members: Sarah Bush, Meredith Hartsook Sophom*ore Members: Cameron Jefferson Mack Freshman Members: Freshman members to be elected in the fall Auxiliary Council is made up of members who volunteer to join Student Council. Any student can join by coming to Student Council meetings held on Tuesdays during 4th, 6th, and 8th period lunches.

SENIOR CLASS

CLASS OFFICERS: Class Activities:

JUNIOR CLASS

CLASS OFFICERS: Prom Chairs: Class Activities:

SOPhom*oRE CLASS CLASS OFFICERS: Class Activities:

FRESHMAN CLASS CLASS OFFICERS: Class Activities:

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President – Will Kulis Secretary – Mary Creech Vice President – Bailey Lund-Goldstein Treasurer – Eli McCarty Senior Council, Senior Picnic, Super Senior Group Photo, Senior Social Activity, Senior Service Project, Senior Retreat, Senior Video/Slide Show, Class Gift, Baccalaureate/Commencement, Sponsor Delegates to Leadership Retreat

President – Savanna Wills Secretary – Kayla Parkhill Vice President – Noelle Spence Treasurer – Anna Susel Josie Coffee, Ashley D’Angelo, Laurie Farley, Olivia Orf Junior-Senior Prom, Prom Committee/Prom Works, Silent Auction Prom Fundraiser, Additional Fundraiser Projects for Prom as Needed, Sponsor Delegates to Leadership Retreat

President – Bekarys Duekenbaev Secretary – Charles Nettle Vice President – Adam Weiss Treasurer – Ian Mail Fundraising for Junior Year Prom, Refreshments for Homecoming Dance, Select Prom Chairmen, Prom Clean-up, Indoor Sports Concession Stand, Sophom*ore Class Advisory Committee, Silent Auction Prom Fundraiser (optional), Sponsor Delegates to Leadership Retreat

Freshman class officers to be elected in the fall Fundraising for Junior Year Prom, Freshman Class Advisory Committee, Concession Sales at Freshman Games, Silent Auction Prom Fundraiser (optional), Freshman Retreat

ACTIVITY & ADVISOR LIST 2016-2017

ATHLETIC TEAMS Athletic Trainers Baseball Basketball - Boys Basketball - Girls Bowling - Boys Bowling - Girls Cheerleaders Cross Country - Boys/Girls Field Hockey Football Golf – Boys Golf – Girls Ice Hockey Lacrosse - Boys Lacrosse - Girls Soccer - Boys Soccer - Girls Softball Swimming - Boys/Girls Tennis - Boys Tennis - Girls Track – Boys Track – Girls Volleyball - Boys Volleyball - Girls Wrestling

ACADEMIC COMPETITION TEAMS Academic Challenge/Quiz Bowl Ohio Model U.N. PenOhio Writing Team CLASSES Freshmen – 2020 Sophom*ores – 2019 Juniors – 2018 Silent Auction Prom Seniors – 2017

Terry Slattery Mike Haney Christian Hunter Craig Foreman Terry Adolph Al Ehlert Renee Manning Bob Murray KC Nemec Tim King Eric Hughes Bryan Harvey Ben Barlow Chris Idone Lauren Kincaid Kiel Cox Curtis Ahrens Becky Myer James Hunt Sheila Shiu Sheila Shiu Paul Wilson Tom Franek Mikala Pritts Ben Marquette Wes Murphy

Craig Foreman Mike Markulis Margana Fahey/Daniela Stuckey

Janelle Cuva/Katelyn Kline Tracy Reschke/TBD Carol Bender/Jennifer Flaherty Jennifer Flaherty Chris Dreher-Rodesheim Eunicy Dolan/Charles Bowman

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CLASSROOM RELATED ACTIVITIES Bridges Academy Club CCSF Colonel Entrepreneur’s Club Expedition Academy FCCLA Club Foreign Language Club French Club German Club Independent Study Latin Club OWS Club Project Support/Kids on the Block Riders Taking Action Science Club Spanish Club Special Olympics Club Yearbook GENERAL OPENING ACTIVITIES Amnesty International Club Art Club Boosters Environmental Club Freshman Connections Planning Committee Gay Straight Alliance Key Club Leadership Retreat PC Perception Magazine Project Unity Roosevelt Film Society S.A.V.E. Ski Club Speech & Debate Student Council Tech Crew Support Club Zoology Club HONORARY ORGANIZATIONS International Thespians National Honor Society Quill & Scroll

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Mary Lynn Bush Emily Suzuki Heidi Jurging Tanya Titus Karynn Barlow/Craig Foreman Jessica Evanson Rob Susel Fetna Mikati Eric Morgan/Andrea Stefaniuk Dennis Love Rob Susel/John Phillips Bryan Harvey Ellen Pochedley Chris Hibbs INACTIVE Kathy Looney Jake Ferlito/Linda Ferlito Janelle Cuva

INACTIVE Mike Haney/Emily Simmons Chris Dreher-Rodesheim/Eunicy Dolan Chris Carman Kelly Foreman/Amy Larkin Elizabeth Fein Brian McCombs Charles Bowman/Chris Dreher-Rodesheim/Heidi Jurging Margana Fahey Tahira Habeeb Dr. John Roebke Jacquie Peoples-Dukes Jeff Thompson Dan Young Amy Larkin Lucy Zaynor Jim Zagray

Sarah Kaplan Dr. John Roebke Heidi Jurging

PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES Drama Guild A. Cast B. Direction C. Production (Fall Play, Winter Musical, Spring One-Acts) Music A. Band 1. Marching Band 2. Color Guard (Andrew) 3. Concert Band & Wind Symphony 4. Jazz Ensemble 5. Pep Band (for Basketball and Ice Hockey games) 6. Solo & Ensemble Competition B. Orchestra 1. Chamber Orchestra 2. Roosevelt Sinfonia C. Vocal Music 1. Chorale 2. Choralworks 3. Men’s Chorus 4. Treble Choir 5. Varsity Women 6. JV Women 7. A.C.E.s (Advanced Choral Ensemble) 8. Solo & Ensemble Competition CAREER & TECHNICAL CLUBS Athletic Health Care & Fitness Club Business & Sports Management Club Computer Aided Design & Engineering Technologies Club Construction Technologies Club Cosmetology Club DECA Club Electronics, Robotics & Programming Club Forestry & Landscape Management Club Health Careers Technologies Club Rider Zone (School Store) Teaching Professions Club

Sarah Kaplan/Jeff Harr

Dr. John Roebke/Aundrea Souza

Molly McCreary

Corey Fowler

Terry Slattery Janelle Cuva/Ben Dunlap Jeff Bee Don Titko Sandi Melucci/Danielle Wardell Brent Pfeiffer Jeff LeSueur John Lang/Tom Franek Catherine Milton Brent Pfeiffer Rhonda Butler

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STUDENT ACTIVITY DESCRIPTIONS

Following are brief descriptions of student activities offered at Theodore Roosevelt High School: Fall Sports Cross Country - Boys/Girls Field Hockey Football Golf – Boys Golf – Girls Soccer - Boys Soccer - Girls Tennis - Girls Volleyball - Girls

ATHLETIC TEAMS Season Begins August 1 August 1 August 1 August 1 August 1 August 1 August 1 August 1 August 1

Winter Sports Basketball - Boys Basketball - Girls Bowling - Boys Bowling - Girls Ice Hockey Swimming & Diving - Boys/Girls Wrestling

November 4 October 28 November 4 November 4 November 4 November 4 November 11

Spring Sports Baseball Softball Lacrosse - Boys Lacrosse - Girls Tennis - Boys Track - Boys Track - Girls Volleyball - Boys

February 20 February 20 February 20 February 20 March 6 March 6 March 6 March 6

Athletic Trainers . . . . are actively involved in each sport season. This activity is open to students in grades 9-12. The purpose of this activity is for students to gain education in the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. This increase in knowledge may be used by the student throughout life in every day living situations. Participants are expected to attend all practices and games as assigned by the Atheltic Training Staff. Cheerleaders . . . .The purpose of this activity is for the students involved to promote and uphold school spirit, to develop a sense of good sportsmanship among the students, and to promote unification of the crowd’s involvement during athletic events. Cheerleading is open to students in grades 9-12 (auditions held at the end of May the previous year). The cheerleaders cheer at football games, basketball games, and pep rallies. Cheerleading Squads Include: Varsity Football, JV Football, Varsity Basketball, and JV Basketball.

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ACADEMIC COMPETITION TEAMS

Academic Challenge/Quiz Bowl . . . . . This activity is sponsored by TV Channel 5 in Cleveland. Each school in the Greater Cleveland/Greater Akron area is encouraged to choose a team of three students to compete against two other schools on a T.V. recall quiz. Roosevelt students are notified about tryouts in early fall. Pupils selected to represent the school practice up until the time of the actual competition on television. The Academic Challenge format is primarily recall of facts. Although a team is selected each year, schools are only permitted to be a part of the television competition every other school year. To assist in preparation for Academic Challenge, students have an opportunity to participate in local Quiz Bowl competitions, as well. Ohio Model United Nations . . . . . The purpose of Ohio Model U.N. is to broaden students’ experiences through exposure to other cultures and worldwide issues. By attending Model United Nations’ conferences, students gain a new appreciation for International cooperation and peace. In addition to attending OMUN conferences, members sponsor fundraisers, such as Battle of the Bands, to defray the cost of conference registration fees. PenOhio Writing Team . . . . . PenOhio is the high school version of the adored middle school writing competition Power of the Pen. Students meet regularly to practice on-demand writing and engage in constructive dialogue that focuses on strengthening their writing. This all leads up to participation in an interscholastic writing competition with other teams from northeast Ohio in the spring. At the 2016 PenOhio tournament, the Roosevelt High School Varsity Team earned first place honors in our region. If you're a passionate creative writer, you need to be a part of the TRHS Pen Team!

CLASSES

Freshman Class . . . . . Led by the Freshman Class Officers (elected in the fall of Freshman year), the class advisors, and members of the Freshman Advisory Committee, Freshmen work together to raise funds for Junior year Prom. For example, students may choose to sponsor a car wash, sell concessions at Freshman athletic events, or participate in other class fundraisers. Also, Freshmen have the opportunity to participate in the Freshman Retreat. Sophom*ore Class . . . . . Members of the Sophom*ore Class work to develop class unity through fundraising, service, and leadership activities. In preparation for the expense of hosting Junior year Prom, Sophom*ores sell concessions at all home boys/girls volleyball games and boys/girls basketball games. Other responsibilities include selecting Prom Chairmen, providing refreshments for the Homecoming Dance, and organizing Prom clean up. Sophom*ores have the opportunity to participate in activities such as the Sophom*ore Class Advisory Committee and the three-day RHS Leadership Retreat. Any Sophom*ore interested in attending the RHS Leadership Retreat should submit an application to the Sophom*ore Class advisor. Junior Class . . . . . Members of the Junior Class work together to present the Junior-Senior Prom. Final fundraiser activities include the sale of Homecoming mum corsages (optional) and the Silent Auction Prom Fundraiser. All Juniors are invited to participate on the Prom Committee. Chairmen for the various Prom subcommittees are selected through an application process. Prom Works begin immediately following Winter Break (once a week) and Spring Break (four days a week – Monday through Thursday) until the Prom. Also, any Junior interested in representing the class at the three-day RHS Leadership Retreat should submit an application to the Junior Class advisor. Senior Class . . . . . Interested members of the Senior Class are invited to apply for Senior Council. On behalf of the class, Senior Council gives input into decisions that need to be made for graduation and other class activities. Senior Class activities include, but are not limited to the following: Senior Picnic, Super Senior Group Photo, Senior Social Activity, Senior Retreat, Senior Service Project, Senior Video/Slide Show, Class Gift, and planning for Baccalaureate and Commencement. The Senior Class is invited to sponsor delegates to the three-day RHS Leadership Retreat. Any Senior interested in representing the class at the Retreat should submit an application to the Senior Class Advisor. Senior Council . . . . . represents the senior class and acts as a decision making group for decisions that do not require complete senior class consensus. This group plans activities for the senior class. Membership in Senior Council requires application and selection.

CLASSROOM RELATED ACTIVITIES

Bridges Academy . . . . . provides a supportive school experience that encourages all students to achieve academic, emotional, and social success. The Bridges Academy is for students in the 9th and 10th grades. CCSF . . . . . promotes awareness of Roosevelt’s MH Program. 57

Colonel . . . . . is the Roosevelt student newspaper. Approximately six to ten issues of The Colonel are published each year. Students on the staff are involved in all aspects of the newspaper including advertising and subscription sales, planning and writing stories, photography, layout, and distribution of printed issues. Students in grades 10-12 may apply for membership on The Colonel staff. The staff meets one class period per day for the entire year. Staff members need to be active, conscientious participants in the various aspects of publishing a newspaper. Entrepreneur’s Club . . . . . combines the expertise of Roosevelt High School students, faculty and Junior Achievement consultants in developing a student operated business. Expedition Academy . . . . . provides an academic and experiential learning opportunity that enhances students’ qualities in the areas of compassion, adaptability, and their capacity to become autonomous learners. FCCLA Club (Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America) . . . . . provides students enrolled in family and consumer science courses and other interested students the opportunity to transfer skills taught in the department’s curriculum to both their school and community environment. Students in FCCLA Club gain both practical and leadership experience as they support activities planned by the family and consumer science department. Foreign Language Club . . . . . The purpose of this club is to plan and coordinate joint activities of Theodore Roosevelt High School’s four foreign language clubs. Activities may include a foreign language dance and overnight, a hayride, and participation in Foreign Language Week. French Club . . . . . enriches students’ appreciation of France and the French culture. The club’s activities include social functions, fundraising activities, and a trip to Quebec. Meetings are usually held on the 2nd Wednesday of the month. Membership is open to present and former French students and dues are charged. German Club . . . . . provides social and cultural opportunities for present and former German students to experience a taste of German food, customs and “Gemütlichkeit”. Independent Study . . . . . is an activity that provides an opportunity for students to pursue an in-depth study of an area in which they are interested; or to meet an academic obligation which cannot be fulfilled in any other way. Independent Study is NOT intended as a substitute for a regularly scheduled class. Participation in Independent Study is open to all students in grades 9-12 through application to the Independent Study Committee. Inquiries should be made to the guidance office. Latin Club . . . . . provides social and cultural activities for members of the Latin classes. OWS Club . . . . . provides an opportunity for member students to become productive citizens through a practical and realistic Work Study Program. Students participate in planned activities and fundraiser projects. Project Support/Kids on the Block . . . . . The purpose of this organization is to promote friendships and acceptance between disabled and non-disabled students at Theodore Roosevelt High School. Through club activities and performances by the Kids on the Block puppeteers, club members strive to increase disability awareness among all students at RHS as well as in the Kent community. Riders Taking Action . . . . . promotes a sense of empathy and social responsibility among students enrolled in the Riders Taking Action (RTA) class. Through volunteer service and class fundraising projects, students become invested in raising money for worthy causes. Science Club . . . . . is to promote interests in the sciences outside the normal classroom experience through open discussion, presentation of new advances in technology, investigation of science using all multimedia, demonstrations of varied topics, and hands-on activities and experiments. It is our hope to enhance the science curriculum with novel ideas. Spanish Club . . . . . gives students the opportunity to work together on projects and, whenever possible, to experience cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Spanish Club is open to students enrolled in a Spanish class and to exchange students from Spanish-speaking countries. The club meets monthly after school. Special Olympics Club . . . . . supports and promotes the Special Olympic Program for handicapped and non-handicapped students. In addition, it serves as a means to inform and spread understanding of the potential of handicapped children to be a vital part of our school and community. Yearbook . . . . . publishes the annual yearbook. Students learn layout and desktop publishing techniques using the computer. Photographers, a business manager, and ad designers are also a part of the staff. Students on the yearbook staff meet one period per day throughout the year. Staff members are selected through application at the beginning of the second semester.

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GENERAL OPENING ACTIVITIES

Amnesty International Club . . . . . members work together to raise awareness of human rights violations around the world; we lend micro-loans to individuals in various parts of the world to help them better their lives; we hold a benefit concert in March to raise money for a worthy charity. Art Club . . . . . All members of the RHS art classes are considered to be members of the Art Club. This club works together to sponsor Open Mic Nights, glass and ceramic fundraisers, RHS art shows, and competitions. Art Club also participates in community-based and school-related art projects. Boosters . . . . . support and provide encouragement to all Theodore Roosevelt High School athletic teams, clubs, and functions. Major activities include assisting Student Council in planning Homecoming and Booster Private. Meetings are held on Mondays at 2:45 p.m., and membership is open to all students who apply and complete the membership requirements. Environmental Club . . . . . Through recycling and other projects, the Environmental Club strives to find creative and effective ways of addressing and educating students and faculty of the benefits of an environmental friendly high school and community. Freshman Connections Planning Committee . . . . . Junior and Senior students are invited to apply for this in March. The Freshman Connections program cultivates Freshman participants’ leadership skills while empowering the planning committee mentors to strengthen and continue Roosevelt’s student legacy of intertwining academic excellence with social awareness. The selected planning committee mentors meet bi-weekly during the summer months and weekly during the fall semester. The mentors may receive Flex-Credit by completing additional assignments. Freshman Connections Program . . . . . is available to ALL incoming freshmen, addressing the academic, social, and emotional needs they may have during their transition from middle school to a high school. Freshmen participate in well-planned events, such as Freshman Kick-Off, Freshman Tailgate Party, and Freshman Retreat) that introduce them to all the amazing opportunities at Theodore Roosevelt High School. Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) . . . . . The Gay Straight Alliance was founded with the intention of encouraging an atmosphere of collective kindness and respect among Roosevelt’s diverse student body. The club strives to recognize and address those issues and hardships faced by straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students in a responsible and positive manner, welcoming opinions and input from all. Key Club . . . . . The Key Club is the high school based unit of Kiwanis International. Membership is open to any student of Theodore Roosevelt High School. The purpose of the club is to provide leadership and service opportunities for students in both the school and community. Key Club meets once a week after school at 2:45 p.m. Leadership Retreat Planning Committee . . . . . Students are selected by means of an application process to plan, implement, and follow-up on the annual Theodore Roosevelt High School Student Leadership Retreat, which focuses on developing students’ individual leadership skills and qualities, held in November of each year. The Planning Committee meets as a class during the fall semester. Perception Magazine . . . . . is a literary publication edited and prepared by students interested in the importance of publishing student writing, artwork, and photography. Submissions are accepted from students of all grade levels. Past editions have included poetry, short stories, essays, artwork, and photography. Project Unity . . . . . works to unite high school students from diverse backgrounds, working together to transition from high school to college or the working community. Project Unity applies a collaborative approach to promote advising on college or career preparedness. Opportunities are provided to participate in field trips, listen to keynote speakers, and develop scholarships by planning fundraiser events throughout the year. Roosevelt Film Society . . . . . is a student organization that meets regularly to watch and discuss noteworthy films of all genres. S.A.V.E. . . . . . stands for Students Against Violence Everywhere. Members work to foster the SAVE Mission: to decrease potential for violence in schools and communities by promoting meaningful student involvement, education, and service opportunities in efforts to provide safer environments for learning. Ski Club . . . . . provides recreational snow skiing and snow boarding for beginners to experts with bus transportation provided to Brandywine ski area. The club goes skiing one night weekly for five weeks, starting in January. Membership in the Ski Club is open to all students. A student must pay equipment rental fees if he or she does not own equipment. Speech and Debate Club . . . . . promotes effective communications skills through workshops and individual coaching offered to members and or the student body; to form and train a speech and debate team to compete in tournaments throughout Ohio; to encourage and support students in public speaking responsibilities. 59

Student Council . . . . . promotes student activities within the school, organizes Student Council’s activities including the Elections, Homecoming, Sadie Hawkins Dance, Rough Rider Open Forum, Student Council Leadership Workshop, Bloodmobile, and other yearly events. Members are elected following a self-nomination process. Membership in the Auxiliary Council is open to all interested students. Student Council meets every Tuesday during 4th, 6th and 8th lunch periods (location TBD). The Executive Committee meets weekly as determined by the advisor and those students involved. Tech Crew Support Club . . . . . is a club for students interested in the technical aspects of the performing arts. Members have the opportunity to “learn the ropes” of running a variety of productions, focusing on learning how to run the lights, sound, and other aspects of a production. Members also have the opportunity to apply for a paid position on the Tech Crew when applicable. Zoology Club . . . . . Members of the Zoology Club can expect to come in contact with, care for, and learn about many different animal species. Biology teacher Mr. Zagray keeps a variety of educationally important and unwanted/rescued exotic animals in his classroom. Club members meet regularly to provide consistent care for these animals, raise funds, and provide live animal presentations for elementary and preschool children.

HONORARY ORGANIZATIONS

International Thespians . . . . . is a world-wide honorary for students who have displayed leadership both on stage and backstage in the theatre arts. Members are selected based on a participation point system established by The International Thespian Society. Members pay a one-time fee upon initiation, which grants them lifelong membership in the society. National Honor Society . . . . .recognizes and honors those students who have achieved in the areas of scholarship, leadership, character, and service. Members are selected from the juniors and seniors who apply and qualify for membership. Academic qualifications include a minimum overall grade-point average of a 3.5. Quill and Scroll . . . . . is an international honorary for recognizing excellence in Journalism. Students are selected in April by advisors according to the criteria set by the national organization. Students must be in the upper one-third of their class scholastically and have done superior work in some phase of journalism.

PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES

Drama Guild . . . . . includes all those students involved in the production of plays, including acting, directing, stage managing, costumes, make-up, publicity, and stage crew. The Drama Guild produces three major shows a year: Fall Play, Winter Musical, and Spring One-Act Plays. Membership to the Drama Guild is open to all students and dues are charged. Band . . . . . Band offers participants a wide range of music-making experiences through the Rough Rider Marching Band, the Roosevelt Wind Symphony, the Roosevelt Concert Band, the Roosevelt Jazz Band, and other small ensembles. All students enrolled in band participate in the Rough Rider Marching Band during the first academic quarter. For the remainder of the year, students are seated by audition in one of two concert bands. Students in band perform several school concerts each year, and they participate in various local and regional contests and festivals. Students new to Kent City Schools must schedule an audition with the director prior to admittance. Marching Band . . . . The goal of the Rough Rider Marching Band is to provide high energy, high quality musical entertainment at football games, band shows, and on parade. The Rough Rider Marching Band is one of the most visible elements of our school district. Color Guard . . . . . Members are chosen in the spring by performing audition and teacher recommendations. Numbers are dependent on the needs of the band and are determined prior to auditions. Members are encouraged to play a band instrument but are not required. Meets 4th/5th periods. Concert Band / Wind Symphony . . . . . are concert bands which facilitate students’ musical growth through the rehearsal and performance of challenging musical literature. Students are placed in one of our two concert ensembles based on a live audition held at the end of marching season. Each student is seated in the ensemble in which he/she will gain the most appropriate and valuable experience. Jazz Ensemble . . . . . is an extra-curricular ensemble that meets one night a week after marching band season. Membership in the Roosevelt Jazz Ensemble is based on standard big band instrumentation and student interest. Participation in this ensemble may be based on the concert band audition. Pep Band (for Basketball & Ice Hockey games) . . . . . provides musical entertainment at select home basketball and ice hockey games. Pep Band is open to all band members. Solo and Ensemble . . . . . Any band student may choose to participate in the OMEA Solo & Ensemble contest. Participants should sign up before Thanksgiving break. For soloists there is an entry fee. Instrumental Music Boosters cover the entry fee for ensembles. See a director for details. 60

Orchestra . . . . Chamber Orchestra . . . . . is offered to any student in high school who plays a stringed instrument. The orchestra performs many concerts each year and participates in large group and solo/ensemble contests, as well as local and regional festivals. If you have a desire to learn a stringed instrument it is never too late. Sign up for this course and see the director as soon as possible. Roosevelt Sinfonia . . . . . is a string ensemble selected by audition. The ensemble performs music from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Modern, and Contemporary periods. The ensemble presents a variety of concert, contest, and festival performances. Participants audition during the spring semester to facilitate scheduling for the following school year. Vocal Music . . . . . Chorale . . . . . Membership in this SSA choir is determined by auditions held in March for the next school year. Women in this choir will be sophom*ores, juniors and seniors. A heavy emphasis is placed on music reading skills, vocal production and advanced choral literature. Students will perform in at least four concerts throughout the school year. There will also be opportunities for participation in local/regional choir festivals as well as district/state competitions. Full participation in all competitions is mandatory. Solo and ensemble experience is available for those students who are especially interested and qualify. This choir meets one period every day in the choir room. A small fee is charged for robe maintenance/cleaning. Choralworks . . . . . Membership in this SATB choir is determined by auditions held in March for the next school year. In this choir, a heavy emphasis is placed on music reading skills, vocal production, and advanced choral literature. Students will perform in at least four concerts throughout the school year. There will also be opportunities for participation in local and regional choir festivals as well as district and state competitions. Full participation in all competitions is mandatory. Solo and ensemble experience is available for those students who are especially interested and who qualify. This choir meets one period every day in the choir room. Students are charged a small fee for robe maintenance and cleaning. Men’s Chorus. . . . . . . This TBB choir is open to all RHS male students. The students in this choir will gain experience in basic elements of music as they explore a wide variety of choral literature. Students will perform in at least four concerts throughout the year. Solo and ensemble experience is available to those students who are especially interested and who qualify. This choir meets one period every day in the choir room. A small fee is charged for robe maintenance and cleaning. Treble Choir . . . . . This SSA choir is open to all RHS female students in grades 9-12. No auditions are required. The students in this choir will gain experience in basic elements of music as they explore a wide variety of choral literature. The Treble Choir will perform in at least four concerts during the year. Solo and ensemble experience is available for those students who are especially interested and who qualify. Students meet one period every day in the choir room. A small fee is charged for robe maintenance and cleaning. Varsity Women . . . . . is a specially selected ensemble of girls. This ensemble experiences advanced choral music for women’s voices and performs special numbers for school concerts, civic groups, and in competition. Varsity Women meet at 2:40 p.m. two days per week after school. Members are chosen by audition. JV Women . . . . . is a developmental vocal ensemble for girls with little or no high school ensemble experience. This ensemble performs for school concerts, civic groups, and in competition. JV Women meet at 2:40 p.m. one day per week after school. Members are chosen by audition. A.C.E.s (Advanced Choral Ensemble) . . . . . is a select SATB ensemble which performs both popular style music with accompanying choreography and advanced repertoire for choral ensembles. They entertain civic groups, perform in school concerts and in competition. Members are selected only from Choralworks by audition. A.C.E.S. meet from 5:00-7:00 p.m. on Monday nights in the choir room. Solo and Ensemble Competition . . . . . serves the purpose of competing for objective judicial ratings with other area music students. Vocal ensembles are selected and prepared at school. Private teachers or the school director may coach solo entries.

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CAREER/TECHNICAL CLUBS

Athletic Health Care and Fitness Club . . . . . promotes interest and education in Sports Medicine and Fitness. Membership is open to students currently enrolled in the Athletic Health Care and Fitness career education class, students who have completed the class, and students working as an assistant in the Athletic Health Care program. Business & Sports Management Club . . . . . is an independent student organization for students enrolled in Business & Sports Management. Students will join Business Professionals of America, the leading CTSO (Career and Technical Student Organization) for students pursuing careers in business management, office administration, information technology and other related career fields. This co-curricular activity that is an integral part of the education program, Business & Sports Management is designed to develop leadership abilities, interest in the American business system, and competency of business occupations. Through planned school and community activities, students with common career objectives become well-adjusted workers. Computer Aided Design & Engineering Technologies Club . . . . . students will join and participate in SkillsUSA. SkillsUSA is a professional organization that is designed to be run by students, for their own growth and benefit. SkillsUSA members develop into well-rounded people with technical, academic and employability skills that will help them get a job and have a successful career. Club members raise funds to provide for lunches while on field trips and to pay for a class picnic. Construction Technologies Club . . . . . promotes appreciation of the construction field and student involvement in class projects, leadership training, and skill development through participation in Construction Technologies class/club activities. Cosmetology Club . . . . . involves students in the cosmetology program in extra-curricular activities. The students do projects together to raise money toward the State Board Exam fees, for student kits, uniforms, alumni awards luncheon, yearbook page, and senior nameplates. Club activities include a hair-a-thon once a month, end of the year banquet, and volunteering at Hattie Larlham. DECA Club . . . . . is a student-centered organization whose program of leadership and personal development is designed specifically for students enrolled in Marketing Education. DECA is a co-curricular organization designed as an integral part of the classroom instructional program. DECA also develops competencies needed for careers in marketing, merchandising, and management. Major activities include selling yearbook advertising space, district, state, and national competitive activities and an employer appreciation banquet. Electronics, Robotics & Programming Club . . . . . promotes interest and education in Electronics, Robotics & Programming. Membership is open to students currently enrolled in the Electronics, Robotics & Programming career education program and students who have completed the program. Forestry & Landscape Management Club . . . . . is open to all members of the Forestry and Landscape Management career education program. The club promotes leadership development in horticulture and stewardship toward the environment. Health Careers Technologies Club . . . . . is the local branch of HOSA- Health Occupations Students of America, the largest student organization for health care related programs in the US. As part of HCT Club, students participate in local, state, and national HOSA competitive events, plan community service projects, attend health care related field trips, meet with health care professionals, and develop leadership and interpersonal communication skills. Rider Zone (School Store) . . . . . is a student-run store (consists of marketing management students) to promote school spirit and unity while also enhancing the business curriculum through various student positions (i.e. board of directors, store manager, assistant manager, etc.). Teaching Professions Club . . . . . is composed of students in the Teaching Profession program. This group works toward goals and participates in social activities. The club serves to increase awareness within the community of education as a profession and to build leadership qualities.

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THEODORE ROOSEVELT HIGH SCHOOL CO-CURRICULAR STUDENT ACTIVITY CONDUCT CODE

This code is applicable to any student in a school approved co-curricular student activity. A co-curricular student activity is defined as a club or group that forms, meets, or practices at times other than or in addition to the regular school day and school year. Compliance with the code is required during the time the co-curricular activity is active and students in the organization are participating in the activity. It is believed that a strong student activities program makes school life richer and more rewarding, and adherence to certain behavioral codes enhances an individual student’s pattern of living. Every participant in co-curricular activities is expected to adhere to the rules of Roosevelt High School and conduct himself/herself as a good citizen within the school and community at all times. The courts have determined that students have a right to attend school. However, courts have also stated clearly that participation in co-curricular activities is not a right but rather a privilege that may be regulated by the school. Therefore, all students who participate in co-curricular activities must follow all regulations of the Kent City Schools Student Conduct Code, the Theodore Roosevelt High School Student-Parent Handbook and Co-Curricular Student Activity Conduct Code as well as the rules of specific clubs or school organizations to which they belong. Each student is expected to: 1. Behave in a manner that reflects positively on the school. 2. Comply with the Kent City Schools Student Conduct Code and Roosevelt High School Student-Parent Handbook. 3. Comply with all rules and requirements set by the club activity advisor and as stated in the club/activity constitution (i.e. attendance expectations, minimum grade standards, etc.) and reviewed by the activity advisor. 4. Attend school at least one-half day (four periods) to be eligible to practice or participate on any given school day (i.e. performing arts rehearsal/event, club meeting, etc.). 5. Meet all financial obligations resulting from equipment/uniform fees, replacement of lost or stolen equipment, and/or unpaid balances from fund raisers. All financial debts must be paid prior to participation in any present or future co-curricular activities. At the beginning of the school year each advisor distributes and reviews a copy of club/activity rules and requirements for participants that include a description of conduct that may cause denial of participation from that organization’s activities. When a violation occurs, the advisor issues the Notice of Denial of Participation that states the violation, the length of time participation is denied, and deadlines for completing consequences. Due process procedures, including appeal to the Superintendent and/or the Board of Education, do not apply to co-curricular activity suspensions, and the decision of the Student Activities Coordinator is final.

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When the violation involves alcohol and/or drugs (Student Conduct Code Items B-10 and B-11): 1. For the first offense that takes place during a school day or at any school sponsored activity, a two-week Denial of Participation from all co-curricular activities (or other appropriate consequence as determined by the club advisor(s) and approved by the Student Activities Coordinator) is assigned. The student must follow through with Roosevelt High School’s automatic consequences as defined in the Student-Parent Handbook, and upon choosing the option to work with the Student Assistance Coordinator, must comply with all recommendations by the deadlines stated on the Notice of Denial of Participation. Failure to complete assigned consequences in the specified time period will result in continued denial of participation. For the first offense that takes place outside of school (as reported by police, parent/guardian or self-admission), the student will have the choice of a two-week Denial of Participation from all co-curricular activities (or other appropriate consequence as determined by the club advisor(s) and approved by the Student Activities Coordinator) or participation in a school-approved alcohol and/or drug assessment and counseling program as specified by the school’s Student Assistance Coordinator. The student selecting this option must meet, along with a parent/guardian, with the Student Assistance Coordinator and comply with all recommendations by the deadlines stated on the Notice of Denial of Participation. Failure to complete assigned consequences in the specified time period will result in continued denial of participation. 2. For the second offense (inside or outside of school) during a student’s high school career, the student is subject to Denial of Participation for one calendar year pending completion of a program to be determined by the student, parent/guardian, Student Assistance Coordinator, Guidance Counselor and Student Activities Coordinator. Upon completion of the program or after twelve months from the date of the violation, the student may petition a hearing committee in order to once again participate in co-curricular activities. The written petition should include an appropriate action plan for the student’s involvement in specific activities. The hearing committee, consisting of the Student Assistance Coordinator, Guidance Counselor and Student Activities Coordinator, will approve the action plan and support the student in its implementation. 3. Any additional violations may lead to denial of participation for the balance of a student’s high school career.

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AUGUST 1 1 2 2-5 2 2 2-3-4 2 3-4 5 5 6 9-10-11 9-10-11 10 11 15-16 15 16 16 16 16 17 17 18

19 22 22-23 22 24 24 24 25 26 29 29 30 31 31 SEPTEMBER 1-13 2 5

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 2016-2017 Fall Sports Begin Orchestra Leadership Workshop Marching Band Pictures Orchestra Camp Fall Sports Coaches’ Meeting Fall Sports Parent & Athlete Meeting Freshman Connections Summer Meetings Fall Sports Individual Team Meeting Marching Band Rehearsals Registration Deadline — 9/10 ACT Test Orchestra Camp Concert Fall Sport Picture Day Marching Band Rehearsals Freshman Connections Summer Meetings Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting Freshman Parent Orientation Opening Staff Meetings Marching Band Parent Night Freshman Kick-Off & Class Opening Assembly New Student Orientation Meeting BOE Meeting at DePeyster Marching Band at Cuyahoga Falls Band Show FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL — All Students 9-12 RHS Premiere of Bands Opening Grade Level Assemblies 1st period – 10th Grade Assembly 2nd period – 11th Grade Assembly 3rd period – 12th Grade Assembly 2015-16 Yearbook Distribution (Lunch Periods) First Booster Club Meeting (Mondays through 5/8) Vocal Ensemble Auditions First Freshman Connections Meeting (Mondays through 12/5) Senior Class Parent Guidance Information Night Class Ring Information & Order Night FOLLOW-THE-SCHEDULE NIGHT for Parents Class Ring Order Day (Lunch Periods) First JV Women Choir Ensemble Rehearsal (Fridays through 5/5) Begin Ensemble Rehearsals (M-F though 5/5) Homecoming Works First Drama Guild Meeting Homecoming Works Marching Band Rehearsals (Wednesdays though 10/12) Freshman Elections — Info. Available in Activities Office Activity Budgets Due to Martha Pifer LABOR DAY — NO SCHOOL

TIME 12:00 pm 4:00 pm 9:00 am 5:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 pm 6:00 pm 6:00 pm 8:00 am 6:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm TBA 7:00 pm 8:00 am 11:00 am 5:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 am 7:00 pm

10:20 am 2:45 pm 2:45 pm 7:30 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 10:10 am 2:45 pm 6:40 am 6:00 pm 2:45 pm 6:00 pm 6:00 pm TIME 3:00 pm 65

6-7-8 6 7 7 7 9 9 9 10 11 12 13 13-14-15 13 13 13 13 14 14 & 15 14 16 16 16 17 19-22 20-23 20 21 21 21 22 22 & 23 23 23 23 24 24 25 28 OCTOBER 1 1 4 5 66

Homecoming COURT NOMINATIONS Fall Play Auditions SCHOOL PICTURE DAY Executive Teachers Meeting Homecoming Works Senior Class Group Photo (1st Period) Ravenna Pep Assembly Freshman Connections Tailgate Party ACT Test at RHS RHS Choir Performs at Art in the Park Homecoming Works Senior Class Guidance Assembly #1 (2nd Period) Homecoming COURT VOTING (Lunch Periods) First Key Club Meeting (Tuesdays) Freshman Elections — Intent-to-Run Forms Due KEA Trustees Meeting Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting Faculty Meeting Homecoming Works Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting INTERIM GRADES CLOSE Registration Deadline — 10/22 ACT Test Freshman Elections — Required Training Seminar for Candidates Marching Band at Stow Band Show Homecoming Works Homecoming Ticket Sales (Lunch Periods) BOE Meeting at DePeyster Homecoming Court Stadium Rehearsal w/ Band First National Honor Society (NHS) Meeting Powder Puff Football Tournament INTERIM GRADE REPORTS DISTRIBUTED Homecoming KING & QUEEN VOTING (Lunch Periods) Freshman Elections — Self-Nomination Forms and Class Officer Candidate Speeches Due Homecoming Court Pre-Game Reception Homecoming Football Game vs. Tallmadge Homecoming Works Homecoming Dance Homecoming Clean-Up Sophom*ore/Junior Class Parent Guidance Info Night SAT Test (not at RHS) RHS Band in KSU Homecoming Parade Freshman Elections — Mandatory Speech Rehearsal for Freshman Class Officer Candidates Executive Teachers Meeting

10:20 am 2:45 pm 7:30 am 2:45 pm 6:00 pm 7:30 am 1:50 pm 5:00 pm 7:30 am TBA 6:00 pm 8:25 am 10:20 am 2:45 pm 3:00 pm 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 6:00 pm 7:00 pm

10:20 am 7:00 pm 6:00 pm 10:20 am 7:00 pm 10:20 am 2:40 pm 6:00 pm 10:20 am 3:00 pm 6:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 am 8:00 pm 1:00 pm 7:00 pm TIME 11:00 am 10:20 am 2:45 pm

5 6 9 10 11 11 11 12 12 13 13 14 14 18 18 18 18 19 19 19 20 21 21 22 24-28 25 26 26 28 28 28 29 NOVEMBER 2 3-4-5 4 4 5 5 8 8 8 8 9 9

College Financial Aid Info Night Freshman Elections — Final Speech Rehearsal for Freshman Class Officer Candidates (as needed during Lunch Periods) RHS & SMS Fall Choir Concert ACT Seminar School Picture Re-Take Day (Lunch Periods) KEA Trustees Meeting Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting Faculty Meeting Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting Freshman Elections — Speech Assembly (1st Period) Freshman Elections — VOTING (Lunch Periods) Registration Deadline — 10/19 PSAT/NMSQT Test Freshman Elections — Run-Off Election (If Needed) Winter Sports Coaches’ Meeting BOE Meeting at Davey Winter Sports Parent & Athlete Meeting Winter Sports Individual Team Meetings PSAT/NMSQT Test at RHS NHS Meeting RHS Band Concert RHS & SMS Fall Orchestra Concert at RHS END FIRST GRADING PERIOD Last Home Football Game vs. Copley (Senior Night & Script Kent) ACT Test at RHS OGT Testing for Grade 12 Open Mic Night Leadership Retreat MANDATORY Pre-Retreat Meeting for Delegates First Jazz Band Rehearsal (Wednesdays through 5/17) REPORT CARDS DISTRIBUTED Girls’ Basketball Begins LRPC Crunch Time LRPC Crunch Time Executive Teachers Meeting RHS Leadership Retreat Boys’ Basketball, Bowling, Ice Hockey, Swimming & Diving Begin Registration Deadline — 12/10 ACT Test SAT Test (not at RHS) RHS Craft Show Election Day — NO SCHOOL for Students FACULTY IN-SERVICE DAY KEA Trustees Meeting Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting Faculty Meeting Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting

7:00 pm TBA 3:00 pm 7:30 am 10:20 am 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm TBA 10:20 am 10:20 am 5:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 pm 8:00 am 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 am 7:30 am 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 6:00 pm TBA 2:45 pm 8:00 am TIME 2:45 pm 11:00 am TBA

9:00 am 7:30 am 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 67

11 11 11 12 14-18 14 15 15 16 17 18 18 18 & 19 19 21 22 22 23-24-25 29 29 29 29 29 DECEMBER 1 1 3 4 6 7 7 8 9 & 10 10 13 13 14 14 15 15 16 17 19 20 20 21 68

Wrestling Begins Freshman Retreat RHS Band at Veteran’s Day Performance Fall Play All-day Rehearsal Canned Food Drive Challenge (1st Period) Madrigal Dinner Rehearsal at SMS Winter Sport Picture Day BOE Meeting at Walls NHS Meeting Fall Play INTERIM GRADES CLOSE Freshman Retreat Fall Play Community Food Drive Challenge PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES (Evening) NO SCHOOL for Students PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES (All Day) THANKSGIVING BREAK — NO SCHOOL Club Photo Day NHS Induction Rehearsal Winter Musical Auditions NHS Induction & Reception Madrigal Dinner Rehearsal at SMS INTERIM GRADE REPORTS DISTRIBUTED Silent Auction Prom Fundraiser SAT Test (not at RHS) Holiday Choir Concert RHS & SMS Orchestra Concert at RHS Executive Teachers Meeting Madrigal Dinner Rehearsal at SMS RHS Band Concert RHS Choir’s Madrigal Dinner ACT Test at RHS KEA Trustees Meeting SMS Band Concert at RHS Faculty Meeting Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting Open Mic Night SMS Choir Concert at RHS Jazz Ensemble Holiday Lunch Concert (Lunch Periods) Perception Poetry Slam (location TBD) SEMESTER EXAMS BOE Meeting at DePeyster SEMESTER EXAMS END SECOND GRADING PERIOD & FIRST SEMESTER

TBA 7:30 am 2:00 pm 8:00 am 7:30 am 5:00 pm 2:30 pm 7:00 pm 2:40 pm 6:00 pm 7:30 am 7:30 pm 8:00 am 5:00 pm 9:00 am 7:30 am 2:40 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 5:00 pm TIME 6:00 pm 3:00 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 5:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 am 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 10:20 am 7:00 pm TBD 7:00 pm TBD

21 21 21 22-Jan. 3 JANUARY 4 4 5 5 10 10 11 11 13 13 16 17 18

18 19 21 21 24 & 25 25 28 29 FEBRUARY 1 1 2 2 7 8 8 10 11 11 11 14 14 15 16

SEMESTER EXAMS EARLY RELEASE for Students FACULTY IN-SERVICE WINTER BREAK — NO SCHOOL FACULTY IN-SERVICE – NO SCHOOL for Students Executive Teachers Meeting CLASSES RESUME SECOND SEMESTER BEGINS Prom Works Begins for Juniors (Tuesdays through 3/14) Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting Faculty Meeting Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting Registration Deadline — 2/11 ACT Test REPORT CARDS DISTRIBUTED MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY — NO SCHOOL KEA Trustees Meeting Grade Level Orientation to Scheduling Assemblies 1st period – 9th Grade Assembly 2nd period – 10th Grade Assembly 3rd period – 11th Grade Assembly NHS Meeting 8TH Grade Scheduling Orientation SAT Test (not at RHS) Band/Choir/Orchestra OMEA District IV High School Solo & Ensemble Contest at Firestone HS Choir Auditions for 2017-2018 College Credit Plus Meeting RHS Ice Hockey Reverse Raffle & Silent Auction RHS Bands to Severance Hall

TBD 12:10 pm 12:30 pm TIME 7:30 am 2:45 pm

6:00 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm

3:45 pm

2:45 pm 7:30am & 12:00pm

RHS & Six District Compact CTE Visitation Executive Teachers Meeting CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION CONVERSATION W/ PARENTS EIGHTH GRADE OPEN HOUSE (Alt. Date 2/7) National Math Exam Faculty Meeting Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting INTERIM GRADES CLOSE ACT Test at RHS Black History Month Program Fine Arts Ball KEA Trustees Meeting Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting NHS Meeting INTERIM GRADE REPORTS DISTRIBUTED

8:00 am 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 6:00 pm 11:30 am TIME TBA 2:45 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 am 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 am 2:00 pm 6:00 pm 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 69

16 16 16 19 20 20 25 25 27-3 28 MARCH 1-15 1 2 3 3&4 5 6 6-10 7 7 8 8 8 9 10 11 11 11 14 14 14 14 15 15 16 17 17 18 18 20 21 23-24-25 23 70

Spring Sports Coaches’ Meeting Spring Sports Parent & Athlete Meeting Spring Sports Individual Team Meetings Ski Club’s Ski Trip to Peek ‘n’ Peak PRESIDENTS’ DAY – NO SCHOOL Baseball, Lacrosse, Softball Begin OMEA Orchestra Concert All-day Winter Musical Tech Rehearsal Winter Musical Ticket Sales (Lunch Periods) Senior Class Guidance Assembly #2 (2nd Period) Spring Elections Info. Available in Activities Office Executive Teachers Meeting Winter Musical Registration Deadline — 4/8 ACT Test Winter Musical Winter Musical Boys Tennis, Boys Volleyball, Track & Field Begin OGT Testing for Grade 12 One-Act Play Auditions All-City Band Extravaganza Faculty Meeting Pre-District Choir Concert Rough Rider All-Sports Boosters Meeting All-City Choir Concert Band OMEA Large Group Contest (@ Cuyahoga Falls HS) SAT Test (not at RHS) Choir OMEA Large Group Contest (location TBD) RRASB Taste of Kent & Night at the Races (location TBD) Pi Day (hosted by Math Department) Spring Sport Picture Day KEA Trustees Meeting RHS & SMS Orchestra Concert Spring Elections — Intent-to-Run Forms Due in Activities Office NHS Meeting RHS Band Concert END THIRD GRADING PERIOD Spring Elections — Required Training Seminar for Class Officer and Student Council Representative Candidates (Lunch Periods) Key Club Breakfast with the Easter Bunny Sadie Hawkins Dance Prom Works Begin for Junior Class — 4 Nights/Week (M-TH through 4/28) Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting Senior Class Trip to New York City Spring Elections — Candidate Self-nomination Forms & Speeches DUE in Activities Office

5:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:30 pm 5:30 am TBA TBA 8:00 am 10:20 am 8:25 am TIME 2:45 pm 6:00 pm 7:30 pm 3:00 pm TBA 7:30 am 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm TBA TBA 6:00 pm 9:00 am 2:30 pm 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 3:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 10:20 am 8:00 am 7:00 pm 6:00 pm 7:00 pm TBA 3:00 pm

24 27-31 APRIL 5 5 8 11

11 11 11 12 12 12 14 15 17-21 18 19 20-21-22 21 22 22 22 25 25 26-27-28 26 27 27 28 29 30 30 MAY 1-5 2 2 2 3

REPORT CARDS DISTRIBUTED SPRING BREAK — NO SCHOOL Spring Elections — MANDATORY Speech Rehearsal for Class Office Candidates (Lunch Periods) Executive Teachers Meeting ACT Test at RHS Spring Elections — Class Elections Speech Assembly 1st period – 9th Grade Assembly 2nd period – 10th Grade Assembly 3rd period – 11th Grade Assembly Spring Elections — Class Elections VOTING for Freshmen, Sophom*ores, Juniors only (Lunch Periods) KEA Trustees Meeting Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting Faculty Meeting RHS Jazz Band Concert at Davey Rough Rider All-Sports Booster Meeting GOOD FRIDAY – NO SCHOOL Last Chance to Order 2016-17 Yearbook; Deadline for Senior Photo & Senior Congrats One-Acts Ticket Sales (Lunch Periods) Instrumental Music Awards Banquet NHS Meeting One-Act Plays INTERIM GRADES CLOSE Choir OMEA Large Group State Contest AP Calculus Practice Exam Kent Area Chamber of Commerce & RHS DECA Community Expo Senior Class Guidance Assembly #3 & Reception (2nd and 3rd Periods) SMS Choir Concert at RHS All-Day Prom Works for Qualifying Juniors AP Test Pre-Registration Meeting (1st Period) INTERIM GRADE REPORTS DISTRIBUTED SMS Band Concert at RHS Prom Works Final Set-up JUNIOR-SENIOR PROM Vintage Venture Senior Citizens Prom at RHS Sophom*ore Class Prom Clean-Up Advanced Placement Exams Career Technical Education Welcome to the Program Reception (All CTE Programs, except AHCF) AHCF "Celebrates Success" Program Instrumental Music Boosters Meeting Executive Teachers Meeting

TIME 10:20 am 2:45 pm 7:30 am TBA

10:20 am 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm

10:20 am 6:30 pm 2:45 pm 7:30 pm TBA 8:00 am 10:00 am 8:25 am 7:00 pm 7:30 am 7:45 am 7:00 pm 6:00 pm 7:30 pm 1:00 pm 4:30 pm TIME TBA 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 71

5 5 5 6 8-12 8 8 9 9 10 10 10 11 13 16 17 17 17 18 18 18 18 19 19 19 20 21 21 22 22 23 24 24 24 25 25 29 30 JUNE 1 3 10 14

72

Registration Deadline — 6/10 ACT Test POPs Preview Assembly for SMS Students POPs Concert SAT Test (not at RHS) Advanced Placement Exams Scholar & Achievement Awards Program Meeting (9th Period) Pre-Engineering Academy Celebrates Success KEA Trustees Meeting Scholar & Achievement Awards Program & Reception Faculty Meeting Open Mic Night Rough Rider All-Sports Booster Meeting RHS Band Concert Sports Physicals RHS & SMS Orchestra Concert CTE Passport Program & Reception (3rd Period) NHS Meeting Choir Banquet Cap & Gown Distribution for Seniors Senior Honors Assembly/Senior Slide Show (1st, 2nd, 3rd Periods) Senior Class Picnic Celebration Jazz Band/Orchestra Home Town Bank Concert LAST DAY FOR SENIORS Graduation Practice for Seniors at KSU MAC Center New Freshman Band Day Band/Orchestra Trip to Cedar Point BACCALAUREATE AT KSU MAC CENTER COMMENCEMENT AT KSU MAC CENTER SEMESTER EXAMS Thespian Induction & Banquet SEMESTER EXAMS END FOURTH GRADING PERIOD & SECOND SEMESTER LAST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR STUDENTS SEMESTER EXAMS Records Day Summer School Registration MEMORIAL DAY Summer School Begins (May 30 – July 6) REPORT CARDS MAILED HOME SAT Test (not at RHS) ACT Test at RHS Rough Rider All-Sports Booster Meeting

8:30 am 7:00 pm TBA 12:45 pm 7:00 pm 3:45 pm 7:00 pm 2:45 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 8:00 am 7:00 pm 9:30 am 2:40 pm 6:00 pm 7:00 am 7:50 am 11:30 pm 7:00 pm 8:30 am 3:00 pm 7:30 am 1:00 pm 2:30 pm TBD 6:00 pm TBD

TBD 7:35 am 11:00 am 8:00 am TIME

7:30 am 7:00 pm

MONTHLY MEETINGS 2nd Tuesday of Month 3rd Tuesday of Month 1st Wednesday of Month 2nd Wednesday of Month

KEA Trustee Meetings Board of Education Meetings Executive Teacher Meetings Faculty Meetings

IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS

Main Switchboard Attendance Office/Voice Mail To report absences, please call evenings or before 9:00 a.m. daily. Principal’s Office Assistant Principal’s Office Central School Office Career & Community Education Office Activities/Athletics Office Guidance Office Student Assistance Coordinator’s Office Clinic Library Fitness Center Stadium/Coaches Swimming Pool Bus Garage

330-676-8700 330-676-8750 330-676-8710 330-676-8715 330-676-8650 330-676-8740 330-676-8770 330-676-8720 330-676-8785 330-676-8705 330-676-8730 330-474-0451 330-676-8795 330-676-8760 330-676-7690

73

PEOPLE YOU SHOULD KNOW FOR 2016-2017 ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM

Principal Assistant Principal Assistant Principal Director of Career & Community Education Guidance Department Chair Athletic Director Student Activities Coordinator

GUIDANCE COUNSELORS

Ninth Grade - Class of 2020 Tenth Grade - Class of 2019 Eleventh Grade - Class of 2018 Twelfth Grade - Class of 2017

SUPPORT PERSONNEL

Aramark Auditorium Manager Cafeteria Manager Head Custodian Library/Media Specialist Pool Manager Resource Officer School Nurse School Psychologist Student Assistance Coordinator

OFFICE PERSONNEL

Activities/Athletics Secretary Assistant Principal’s Secretary Attendance Secretary Career Education Secretary Cashier Guidance Secretary Guidance Technician Information Processor Library Secretary Main Office Secretary Principal’s Secretary

74

Mr. Dennis Love Mrs. Mary Lynn Bush Ms. Daniela Stuckey Mr. Brian Bachtel Mrs. Deborah Rutzky Mr. Mark Pfaff Mrs. Heidi Jurging

330-676-8719 330-676-8717 330-676-8710 330-676-8740 330-676-8725 330-676-8770 330-676-8772

Mr. Randy Kline Mr. Aaron Carlton Mrs. Deborah Rutzky Mrs. Shannon Cooper

330-676-8727 330-676-8726 330-676-8725 330-676-8724

Ms. Vanessa Mowrer Ms. Lucy Zaynor Mrs. Bernadette Goodwin Mr. Monty Hoffman Mrs. Jennifer Flaherty Mr. James Hunt TBD Ms. Rita Baker Mr. Jason Hedges Mrs. Jacquie Peoples-Dukes

330-676-8643 330-676-8780 330-676-8707 330-676-8708 330-676-8732 330-676-8760 330-676-8769 330-676-8705 330-676-8743 330-676-8704

Mrs. Carmella DeLeone Ms. Lyndee Wolf Mrs. Kay Walker Mrs. Edna Hensel Mrs. Martha Pifer Mrs. Paula Fisher Mrs. Joan D’Aurelio Mrs. Sharon Weiss TBD Mrs. Nicole Harris Mrs. Becky Thomas

330-676-8771 330-676-8716 330-676-8750 330-676-8740 330-676-8703 330-676-8721 330-676-8728 330-676-8651 330-676-8731 330-676-8701 330-676-8711

NOTES

75

[PDF] STUDENT HANDBOOK ACKNOWLEDGMENT FORM - Free Download PDF (2024)

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